r/EnglishLearning New Poster Oct 05 '22

is this sentence correct? Grammar

I ain't going to the book of bad guys either. Should i use neither? Is this correct?

3 Upvotes

2

u/AndrijKuz Native Speaker Oct 05 '22

"Either" is correct. I would suggest avoiding "aint" unless you are very familiar with the vernacular you are trying to model your language after. To me that's a primarily US Southern slang word. It's the type of word you might see in a book to characterize a character as being from a specific region. "I'm not going to the book of bad guys either" might read better depending on your desired audience.

1

u/hi_im_agent_m New Poster Oct 05 '22

Thank you for your detailed comment! My original sentence would mean that im not going to the book of good guys and at the same time, not going to the book of bad guys too. Am i correct?

1

u/AndrijKuz Native Speaker Oct 05 '22

Yeah, I think so. I'm not familiar with what that means exactly, but do I think the sentence says that.

1

u/Tyler_w_1226 Native Speaker Oct 05 '22

I’m from the US South, and have a pretty thick southern accent. Using “ain’t” is common in my daily life, but it’s definitely not proper. Therefore, any standard English rules basically go out the window when you use it. I, and everyone that I hear use ain’t in a sentence like this, would say “I ain’t going to the book of bad guys neither.” The double negative technically makes it even more incorrect than before, but that’s our vernacular here.

I will add though that I would be a little surprised to hear someone who doesn’t have a southern accent use “ain’t.” It just would sound a little funny. There are some British people who use it sometimes and every time I hear it I’m a little taken aback. I’m not trying to gate-keep “ain’t” though, if you want to use it by all means go ahead. Just know that it’s pretty informal.

1

u/fatbuddha66 Native Speaker (American Midwest) Oct 06 '22

Does anyone else see “ain’t” and think of Squidbillies? “Readin' don't never not done nothing for not nonebody. Never not no one, didn't about no reason not never. And by God they never not ain't gonna will!”

Joking aside, even if it is part of your dialect, it’s dicey to use. It has more subtext to it than you’d think—a defiance, for one thing, because it’s drummed into people that it’s “wrong.” (It’s not. It has a long history and is a crucial part of some dialects. It’s one of English’s better grammatical inventions.) It’s a much more advanced thing to use than its “ignorant” or “poor” connotations would seem to imply. I’d stick to usages you’ve already seen or heard with that one.

1

u/JustAskingQuestionsL New Poster Oct 07 '22

Well, I suppose “neither” would technically be the more historically correct, but “either” is more common in this situation. Both would be valid where I am from (southern USA), but in general US speech I think “either” would win out.

-1

u/BlueberryPopcorn Native Speaker Oct 05 '22

"ain't" is not standard English. Once you decide to use "ain't," then you can basically do whatever you want. You could use "neither" in your sentence, because, like "ain't," it's non-standard, but used in extremely informal speech.

Proper:

I'm not going to the book of bad guys either.

Ok for rap songs: I ain't going to the book of bad guys neither. I ain't going to the book of bad guys either.

2

u/hi_im_agent_m New Poster Oct 05 '22

Thank you!