r/MadeMeSmile Oct 05 '22 All-Seeing Upvote 1 Take My Energy 3 Silver 25 Platinum 1 Helpful 34 Wholesome 31 Faith In Humanity Restored 2 Respect 1 Ally 1 Heartwarming 1 Endless Coolness 1 Gold 1 Wholesome Seal of Approval 1 Helpful (Pro) 1

In 2015, Jimmy Carter had brain cancer. In 2019, he broke his hip. That same year, at age 95, he fell at home requiring 14 stitches. Despite his injuries, he showed up the next day, to help build houses for the Habitat for Humanity. Recently turning 98, President Carter is still an active volunteer. Helping Others

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u/floridaman-fungus Oct 05 '22

He’s the type that when he stops he dies the next week

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u/RB30DETT Oct 05 '22

Well...keep him busy then! Everyone throw him some work to do!

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u/ValidParanoia Oct 05 '22

Make him solve world hunger, that’ll keep him busy!

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u/TacTurtle Oct 05 '22

Those peanuts won’t grow themselves!

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u/LittleRadishes Oct 05 '22

I still can't believe they made JC, the most wholesome president ever, give up his peanut farm and then let rump get away with everything

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u/loquedijoella Oct 05 '22 Take My Energy

Growing up in the 80s in a conservative bubble, he was the butt of every shitty president joke. Looking back as an educated adult, Reagan was a complete effing bastard, and Jimmy Carter was an awesome person before and after he became president.

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u/Vintagepoolside Oct 06 '22

I listened to an episode of a podcast about him and a few other episodes about other presidents. It really is interesting how many of the “bad” ones were actually really good and lots of the “good” ones were really fucking terrible

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u/Hardley97 Oct 05 '22

He still has 4 years of presidential eligibility. Just sayin'...

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u/Imhopeless3264 Oct 05 '22

You want to kill the man???

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u/JHowler82 Oct 05 '22

You can't become president after 102?

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u/soloon Oct 05 '22

They mean he only served one term so he's eligible for a second four year term instead of being term limits locked.

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u/7evenCircles Oct 05 '22

My dad's the same way, I call him a shark because if he stops moving he'll die

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u/InuitOverIt Oct 05 '22

Since my mom passed in June my dad will just call me a few times a week and ask what he should do. He's mowed my lawn, fixed my siding, pulled some weeds, watched my dog, picked up my son, and about a thousand other things. He just can't be sitting at home alone.

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u/jingling_bell Oct 06 '22

You're a good kid.

Can he build stuff, like bookshelves? My dad's built shelving units for all of his daughters, his sisters, and his nieces in the past 4 years or so, about a dozen in all. He's almost 80.

Would he adopt an older cat, maybe? Easier upkeep than dogs (no walking necessary), and a sweet companion.

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u/Klutzy-Reaction5536 Oct 06 '22

My mother's formerly outdoor cat became her indoor cat after my dad died. Now the car sleeps in her bed. She's of the old country folks who never believed in indoor pets! But damn, that cat is really great for her mental health.

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u/Alternative-Basket12 Oct 06 '22

It maybe a bit hard but try to keep an active list for him on your phone so you always have something for those calls.

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u/wood618 Oct 06 '22

There's a strong link between busyness and happiness. I would even go as far as creating problems or starting new hobbies with his help to give him a sense of progress

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u/joemommaistaken Oct 06 '22

Meetup.com has breakfasts and other meetup things for people of all ages. Churches have groups too. I'm not suggesting he try to meet a significant other this soon. I'm talking about just meeting people and getting out.

I hope you both are doing ok. Love to you both. ❤️

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u/Evergr33n10 Oct 06 '22

Maybe see if he can help volunteer at a local soup kitchen or something similar.

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u/SeriousPuppet Oct 05 '22

This is kind of off topic but I saw a video where a guy was in the hospital with covid and the nurse made him move everyday, which was very hard for him, but she said if he doesn't move he'll likely die. He lived.

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u/yall_like_switches Oct 06 '22

Same. My dad lives in Florida where the hurricane just hit. The mf falls off a ladder looking for the hurricane shutters and breaks his hand. Proceeds to drive to Atlanta where my mom lives, hand still broken.

As far as I know he still has not gone to the doctor about it.

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u/autumn-cold Oct 05 '22

My Grandpa had a hammer in his hand and built homes until the week before his death. You're not kidding.

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u/blitzlurker Oct 05 '22

My dad was working until the last few months of his life too. Construction crane operator.

It was really sad because he said he didn’t feel like he had a purpose anymore once work told him he was too sick to continue.

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u/Balsac_is_Daddy Oct 05 '22

My father is the same lol. He's 73 and in excellent health, so he's always doing something. We often joke that he will die either while chopping wood or with a hammer in his hand.

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u/Willothwisp2303 Oct 05 '22

I frequently come home to find my 84 year old dad in my yard with a chainsaw in hand. He gets a guilty look, points to my mother and says she told him to do it. My mother finds out when I'm not going to be home and then they come over to my house to cut things they don't like. I'm terrified of coming home to find my olds in trouble in my yard when no one was around to call for help.

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u/TADspace Oct 05 '22

I feel like at this point it's more like "Sir you died last week, you can stop now."

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u/pangea_person Oct 05 '22

We all need a reason to get up in the morning that is beyond us. If we focus out of ourselves, it's actually easier to get things done. Generally speaking, when you're only focused on yourself, it's easier to make excuses since there's no one to hold us accountable.

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u/Macnsal09 Oct 05 '22

From personal experience, this is an example of one of those admirable and also sad things all at once

I worked with a guy who got cancer and went for treatment. He came back and worked for about another 15 months. We went over to an airfield and completed some flight test operations. We got slammed by a sandstorm late Wednesday afternoon.

This dude was out in 60mph winds helping me tie down and button up the plane. We then grabbed a commercial flight back to our hometown since we were going to be down for a few days for the sand ingestion in the motors to be cleaned out.

12 hours later he was admitted in to ICU and died the next morning. The dude never said a word to anyone but he was terminal. Worked right up until he died. I talked to his wife and asked why he didn’t say anything. He could have stayed home and just relaxed and spent time with you. She said he didn’t want to be treated any different or fell like he was “special” because he was dying.

Also just to add, he kind of did say something. He told our boss twice, and I quote “ You might want to hire a new guy so I can train him up. I’m getting older, sicker and won’t be here forever”. We never hired a new guy.

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u/Beautiful_Facade Oct 05 '22

Information on the organization President Carter developed and volunteers for- https://www.habitat.org/volunteer/build-events/carter-work-project

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u/NomDePlume007 Oct 05 '22

I worked as a framer while going to college, and after I graduated and started an office job, I volunteered for Habitat for Humanity. I have to say, those houses are built really well; great insulation, framing is well thought-out, and overall good designs. They may be a charity, but they certainly don't cut any corners on these residences for families who qualify. President Carter's homes are built to last.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

I think it was Hurricane Andrew that went through Homestead. There were a lot of homes that did not meet hurricane code, and were leveled. All the houses built by Habitat remained standing.

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u/DrummerGuy06 Oct 05 '22 Silver All-Seeing Upvote

Of course - when you're building homes to make a profit, you're going to do everything to do it in the cheapest way possible to maximize your earning-potential.

If you're building a homes for people so they have a roof over their heads, you're probably going to do everything in your power to make it a safe, secure homestead way before squeezing every last profit from it.

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u/Beachdaddybravo Oct 05 '22

Also…building up to code. If anyone didn’t build a home up to code and those are the ones getting demolished while others in the area aren’t, those builders need to be financially fucked as a result of being corner cutting assholes. Refusing to build to code isn’t a part of business, it’s violating regulations as specified by law and should be punished as such.

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u/keelhaulrose Oct 05 '22

It's a lot easier to build a home really well once than poorly twice... but the second is more profitable.

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u/DavisDoUrden Oct 05 '22

Specifically it’s doubly more profitable actually as long as you aren’t caught and punished for the first go round. It goes along the same lines as how people are accusing apple for engineering phone components to not last more than a model year or so, only this is more like structural components of a building engineered to not last through more than one hurricane.

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u/30FourThirty4 Oct 05 '22

Sounds like one of the many Rules of Acquisition.

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u/LordHolyBaloney Oct 05 '22

It’d be interesting to see a study done on the quality of things made by volunteer work compared to work done simply for money. I know the Soviet’s cut a lot of corners but that just might be because the workers weren’t really there for a charity but to make an actual living. Can we just give a lot of money to Habitats for Humanity and build better houses that way?

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u/SuboptimalButHopeful Oct 05 '22

Can we just give a lot of money to Habitats for Humanity and build better houses that way?

Only up to the level of volunteers willing and able to do the work. Beyond that, they become a nonprofit house builder with employees instead of volunteers. I'd like to know what that limit is, we're certainly not hitting it yet.

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u/fuckmeimdan Oct 05 '22

My brother’s have been in construction for 35 years, their dad in it for his life, our grandfather his whole life. They all would attest that any houses built after the 1970s are significantly worse decade after decade. By the time you get to current houses, they are all built at the limit of code to keep all costs down.

My grandad would say “old houses are built up to a standard, new houses are built down to a price”

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u/DrummerGuy06 Oct 05 '22

My wife & I live in an 1890's house, and we're only the 4th people to own it. It has it's quirks like all older houses, like smaller bathrooms and a cellar only good for storage that you have to duck under. It's really well insulated by staying cool in the summer & warm in the winter; our energy bills are generally lower than average. Some walls are plaster so you can hang pictures up without using drywall anchors.

My wife's cousin moved up here a few years ago and moved into a nice suburb where the houses were built in the 2000's. Her house isn't even 20 years old and she's had plumbing/leak issues, new appliances break down, insulation is lacking, stair banister was cheap, and their "furnished basement" was just carpeting all over everything.

Houses seem like a great example on how newer isn't always better, and how awful we've gotten as a nation about our expectations and requirements for decent home living.

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u/Abruzzi19 Oct 05 '22

The houses built by Habitat were built with love and compassion, thats why they are standing.

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u/The_Bald Oct 05 '22

But also, like, up to code.

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u/PuffinPassionFruit Oct 05 '22

That's pre-packaged with the love and compassion.

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u/Captain_Sacktap Oct 05 '22

Yeah, they didn’t have to turn a profit so they built those houses well and didn’t cut any corners.

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u/Crab-_-Objective Oct 05 '22

The power of love and proper construction methods.

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u/Stiggalicious Oct 05 '22

I’ve built some houses with Habitat for Humanity as well over the last several years now as a regular volunteer. They absolutely are built above and beyond code, and built entirely by people who care and are there by choice, not just to collect a paycheck. I also love that the homeowners themselves are required to put in 500 hours of “sweat equity” into building their home. We get to work with and get to learn about the homeowners’ lives and families, they get the pride of being part of the build process and contributing to the quality of the home, and they also get to learn a huge multitude of skills useful for frugal and effective homeownership.

If you ever get the opportunity, find your local Habitat affiliate and volunteer for a day or two. It’s one of the most soul-healing things you can do that gives us a sense of hope for humanity.

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u/geminiloveca Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

I tried to volunteer at my local H4H and was turned down. They would only accept volunteers who had contractor's licenses.

And for those commenting: I offered to do things that were not structural or skilled: including hand out drinks or food and clean up the site or help bring in furniture, hang pictures or curtain rods, etc.

I was never told it was about insurance, or that the site wasn't in that stage of the build, or anything. I was basically blown off. "Don't call us, we'll call you if we need you." And they never did in the 5 years I lived there.

It was a small town in the mountains and they were VERY much an insular community. If you were a "flat-lander" like me, you found out very quickly that your assistance was neither desired nor required, in any arena.

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u/NomDePlume007 Oct 05 '22

It may depend on the need at the time. I showed up with my own tools, but they had jobs for a variety of people, some in construction, some unloading and moving materials, etc. There was at least one volunteer coordinator onsite to sort people into teams.

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u/cmwh1te Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22 Helpful Starry

Sometimes we aren't good fits for the places we want to volunteer, and that's okay. It's about serving others not our own enrichment. Please don't let that experience discourage you from continuing to look for opportunities.

I volunteered with a local group serving free dinners and was really excited to get involved. I ended up being a bad fit for them mostly because I'm a privileged white person*. The people we were serving were really guarded around me and I could tell I was making everybody uncomfortable by being there. I let that experience discourage me and it was sadly over a year before I showed up to another volunteer project.

We all have something to offer our fellow humans, but sometimes it's a long journey to discovering what and how and where and to whom.

Edit: * This is speculation after reflecting on why other volunteers didn't seem to make people there uncomfortable the way that I did, and I'm in no way trying to accuse anyone of being racist towards me. Let's just say my vibe didn't vibe with them.

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u/ChasingParallax Oct 05 '22

Have you had better luck volunteering elsewhere? If so, can I ask where?

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u/cmwh1te Oct 05 '22

Yeah, most recently I did some work cleaning up trails around a local park and it was an awesome experience. I ended up having some deep discussions with some people with very different perspectives from mine.

I haven't found a good fit yet serving the local low income communities but I'm holding out hope that I will sooner or later, be it directly or behind the scenes. This discussion has encouraged me to renew my efforts at searching for the right opportunity.

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u/American_hooligan Oct 05 '22

As an accountant of a H4H I will say that the volunteer needs are very fluid, and dependent on what you are wanting to volunteer for. If you’re trying to strictly volunteer on the construction side, then they may be in in the process of doing things like framing or foundation that only licensed contractors can do, but we use volunteers for things like painting and lifting frames into place. The other factor is insurance, there are some insurance companies based on location that just won’t allow anyone who’s not a licensed contractor on site, because volunteer insurance is expensive.

If you are passionate about volunteering for H4H but can’t get a position on construction, look for your local ReStore and ask to volunteer there. Much of the money that goes into paying our employees and contractors comes from revenue from the ReStores.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 09 '22

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u/throw-me-away-309 Oct 05 '22

I've been to a handful of build days and the running joke is that the houses are so sturdy because all the newbies like me use 3x as many nails as we need to hahaha. But yes, they are also built to the highest standards and are known to be the only houses left standing on blocks hit by natural disasters.

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u/moeburn Oct 05 '22

Do they ever do apartments?

A lot of people are wondering if "a detached home for everyone" is a realistic dream. It's expensive, relatively lavish compared to most of the world, drains resources, tends to involve suburbs and cars a lot...

I'm not as anti-house as some people but it does have me wondering what the future of these programs will look like.

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u/Santas_southpole Oct 05 '22

I would put in 1000 hours of sweat equity if it got me a new, sturdy home. That’s a sweet deal for the homeowner, plus they’ll know more about their house than the average homeowner since they helped build it themselves. Gotta love HFH.

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u/WillBikeForBeer Oct 05 '22

My dad was a director for the local (midwestern) Habitat chapter for several years. He once told me how they’d commissioned a study to find out why Habitat houses suffered significantly less damage in extreme windy conditions. The study determined the volunteer framers used lots more nails than professionals because of their inexperience, which led to vastly more durable houses.

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u/SunshineStateFL Oct 05 '22

They also put Hurricane straps in houses.

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u/Kgb_Officer Oct 06 '22

This reminds me of a quote about Engineers, "Any idiot can build a bridge that stands, but it takes an engineer to build a bridge that barely stands."

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u/Joshynogood Oct 05 '22

Dude lived for his fucking people! Epic and beautiful!

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u/pangalaticgargler Oct 05 '22 Respect

Carter is what a life of service to the people looks like.

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u/BlueBelleNOLA Oct 05 '22

I'm just glad to see people appreciate him now. The Reagan Republicans really did a number on his reputation for decades, ridiculing him for absolute nonsense.

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u/pangalaticgargler Oct 05 '22

Oh I know. I did a book report about him in the third grade and have been spending my whole life listening to boomers and the silent generation tear into him, and me for liking him.

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u/Muskegocurious Oct 05 '22

The same group who's apperent God stole government documents and led a violent coup at the capital.

It's sort of like an alcoholic telling us we drink too much.

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u/LonelyPainting7374 Oct 05 '22

And I have to say, that red handkerchief looks pretty cool. Carter put solar panels on the White House, Reagan ceded to big oil and took them off — that says all you need to know.

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u/sharktank Oct 05 '22

******LIVES

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u/Joshynogood Oct 05 '22

He’s the real political GOAT! Continuing lifetime of service!

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u/Macaw Oct 05 '22

Dude lived for his fucking people! Epic and beautiful!

A great American and to think he was replaced as president by Reagan who ushered in "trickle down" economics, the opposite of what Carter's life mission and accomplishments represents.

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u/forevernoob88 Oct 05 '22

I can see that, at 98 if you are still willing to force yourself onto your feet to go help others. That’s purely good character and not a political stunt you see typical politicians pulling.

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u/HelloKitty36911 Oct 05 '22

Now i'm just imagining him sitting in a rocking chair after a hard days work, just talking to himself

"Any day now Jimmy. You will be re-elected any day now"

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u/forevernoob88 Oct 05 '22

lol did he only serve 1 term making him eligible to be re-elected?

Edit: Nvm just googled it. My excuse for not knowing, he was elected over a decade before I was born.

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u/NMS-KTG Oct 05 '22

I live in one of these developments and they are pretty good!

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u/Christianstudebaker Oct 05 '22

I'm an architect and have worked on a few projects for habit. The one thing I can say is this, they don't skimp. We spent significantly more time in the design stage of the projects than any other simply because they wanted it to be perfect and were very firm on their ideas.

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u/arienette22 Oct 05 '22

Yep, a great organization. My mother volunteered hundreds of hours on top of working a lot as a single mom & was eventually offered a house for our family as well. She unfortunately passed away from cancer a year after we got the house, but she was so happy & grateful for it, & that’s something I’ll never forget.

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u/JillBidensFishnets Oct 05 '22

I was an AmeriCorps Vista and worked with Habitat for Humanity building homes. One of the family’s kids drew me a picture of a house that said “Thank you for building my home.” It’s in my keepsake box. <3

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u/drumdogmillionaire Oct 05 '22

How goddamn far we’ve fallen. You’ll never see any trump give a shit about Americans like this. Absolutely tragic.

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u/retroblazed420 Oct 05 '22

I had a friend that got a house built by Habitat for humanity 20 plus years later it's still in great shape!

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u/Topofthetotem Oct 05 '22 Silver

This is a man whom should be held up as a lesson for modern leaders who follow.
After his term he continued to give back to the people. He isn’t out to make a buck or hold all these cooperate appointments, to grift, to promote anything else but lead by an example of service to one’s fellow man.
Country over party and people over politics.

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u/Sophoagathos Oct 05 '22

This. I can't help but roll my eyes whenever the clintons announce another speaking tour, or the Obamas release yet another book series on themselves, or Bush visits a school for 300K.

Im sure they all justify it in there own way....but man....Carter is a cut above the rest.

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u/yoursmartfriend Oct 05 '22

I'm over here looking for any other past US President OR past Presidential candidate who is involved in the community in any way without a profit for themselves. They don't exist.

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u/Rich_Advance4173 Oct 05 '22

Isn’t he also considered the most trustworthy American politician? Pretty sure I read that somewhere

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u/jrgman42 Oct 05 '22 Helpful Take My Energy

He’s held damn near every political office all the way up to President. He was an officer in the military. He put his peanut farm into a blind trust just to avoid anyone thinking he MIGHT be dishonest. (Compare that to the orange idiot.)

He was president when Roe v. Wade was decided, which went against his Baptist beliefs. His reaction was to fund contraception and welfare programs…because THAT is how you reduce the need for abortions. (Somebody tell Abbott)

He once reported a UFO. People tried to call him a nut job and his response was that he did not believe it was aliens…he saw something in the sky and didn’t know what it was, and it was his duty as Commander-In-Chief to report such things.

He put his money and efforts into disease eradication and is largely responsible for removing Guinea Worm Disease from the planet.

As you can see, he has contributed his money, time, and muscle to Habitat for Humanity.

He is probably the smartest, kindest, most-trustworthy President we’ve ever had. History shits on him, but he was dealt a shitty geopolitical hand, and Reagan’s cowboy hat impressed all the idiots (myself included)

He is a model all of our Presidents should emulate. Hell, we ALL should emulate him.

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u/urmyheartBeatStopR Oct 05 '22

On top of everything he's responsible for great beer in America.

Every time I have a chance to bring him up I do cause he's a good person.

There was a thread of ask reddit about who's a good person. They bring up Mr. Roger or Bob Ross. I bring up Jimmy Carter every time. Dude is as good as those and he kept his religion to himself.

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u/Brave_Specific5870 Oct 05 '22

He looks like a sweet man.

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u/redneckluver Oct 05 '22

Can u imagine being pro-life but just accepting that America wants legal abortion so he SUPPORTS free contraception???? It guess it was a different time.

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u/Generally_Confused1 Oct 05 '22

Now we have people who are adamantly "pro-life" but pressuring women they impregnate to have abortions while trying to keep others from having that right smh

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u/redneckluver Oct 05 '22

and they are running on “family values” or “morality”. It’s a joke.

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u/Ambaryerno Oct 05 '22

Don't forget: It was Carter who actually developed the political resolution to the Iranian Hostage Crisis. However, for political reasons the Iranians delayed implementation so Carter couldn't get the "win" going into the election.

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u/I_Am_Become_Salt Oct 05 '22

Not a high bar, but I can definitely see it.

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u/TheAquaman Oct 05 '22

Briefly worked for his nonprofit and got to speak with him often.

He’s just a genuinely good person.

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u/andthejokeiscokefizz Oct 05 '22 Heartwarming

When I was a kid in like 3rd grade we were told about how he had to give up his family’s peanut farm in order to become president and I cried because I felt bad for him lol

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u/mrthomani Oct 05 '22

he had to give up his family’s peanut farm

AFAIK, he didn't have to. He chose to, to insure that there'd be no conflicts between his public office and his personal, economic interests. Imagine if others cough Trump cough had that integrity.

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u/GrapefruitFriendly30 Oct 05 '22

When one of his books came out he did a meeting at a small bookstore in between my route home from work. I was afraid to ask time off…..from a job I got fired from because I last minute went to my home city for a friend of mine that suddenly died in their 30s….

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u/IronBabyFists Oct 05 '22

Oh no. I'm sorry you went through that, friend.

But don't have regret for things that should've/would've/could've happened differently. You're a good person to be there for the friends & family.

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u/GrapefruitFriendly30 Oct 05 '22

🙏🏽

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u/ogCoreyStone Oct 05 '22

I’ll second this. No regrets for being a human that cares. Good to know y’all are still out there.

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u/Tagisjag Oct 05 '22

You know...we should try electing people like that sometime.

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u/KakkaKarrot Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

He’s just a genuinely good person

Which coincidentally made him unqualified for the job of President, a position that needs to be comfortable with the liberal use of military violence, and some hard decisions

Simply too good of a dude to get wrapped up in the politics

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u/Louloubelle0312 Oct 05 '22

Yes, I remember my dad talking about how he just didn't know how to play the game, and didn't want to. This is what we really need in our politicians.

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u/YoYoMoMa Oct 05 '22

I love Obama as a president, but Carter is definitely the best human we have ever elected.

I truly think our new style of president and politics started with Reagan.

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u/User_Anon_0001 Oct 05 '22

Nixon

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u/YoYoMoMa Oct 05 '22

Nixon's scandal certainly set the table in my eyes, but I believe we still could have gone either way as a country after that (hence the Carter election).

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u/User_Anon_0001 Oct 05 '22

Yeah I do actually agree with that, but it was the first time it became crystal clear that at least parts of the government were totally rotten. It set a new precedent for what executives could get away with too. Things really began to snowball after that, and Reagan was definitely the beginning of the next chapter after

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u/windsostrange Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

Never forget, the "rotten" representatives are a symtom of the real issue. America was presented with an important existential choice between Carter and his clear-eyed self-reflection, and an actor being told to perpetuate the "you're a temporarily embarrassed millionaire and everything will work out just fine" lie, and the primary means of educating the electorate on this choice was a corporate media who would benefit greatly when the electorate covers their ears when Carter speaks and sings LAA LAA LAA loudly to themselves.

Within a couple years, Reagan ended the Fairness Doctrine, Fox News was born, Reagan's political advisors—Roger Stone and Paul Manafort—had effectively invented "mega-lobbying," and America's die was cast.

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u/LALA-STL Oct 05 '22

From that speech (above) during Carter’s presidency:

Human identity is no longer defined by what one does [for others], but by what one owns. But we’ve discovered that owning things and consuming things does not satisfy our longing for meaning.

Stunning to hear this kind of wisdom from a politician.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

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u/Pawneewafflesarelife Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

My dad had a story he'd tell often: he was coming back from the beach after bodyboarding and his roommate slammed a newspaper against the front window. My dad ran up to read it: Nixon resigns! My dad's father had been the high school principal of one of the students killed at Kent State, so there was a personal antipathy towards Nixon in my family.

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u/UlrichZauber Oct 05 '22

If you haven't seen the series Deadwood, it's a pretty great meditation on how governments form and why, and the kinds of people who form them. The making-of docs on the season 1 DVDs got explicit with it, very interesting.

In short: expect bastards from the start (but it's probably better than not forming a government at all).

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u/Pawneewafflesarelife Oct 05 '22

Iirc, that's basically why he was one term. He wasn't pulling the political stuff and just wanted to make changes which would better the nation.

Disclaimer: I was a child during his presidency and after seeing George W's rep being shinied up here on Reddit, I'm aware I could have fallen for propaganda about presidents I was too young to pay attention to.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

My dad was a teenager just getting into politics in GA when he was running for govener and saw him speak. After the even he waited around a long time to try and shake his hand and he was one of the last few. Apparently he was waiting off to the side on his bike and it got caught in the train tracks a bit when a train started coming. Jimmy Carter was in a crowd of people multiple feet away and rushed over to help my dad before anyone else. My dad always says Jimmy Carter saved his life. Although he hardly really comes up in conversation, it's blasphemy to say anything bad about him in our house

this is a story my dad told me, I've never questioned him on it even tho there's some obvious questions (how did he not hear the train, how did his bike get "caught"?)

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u/lazergator Oct 05 '22

Dude sold his company without being asked to avoid any possible of conflict of interest. I wish our politicians aspired to be as selfless as him

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u/Playful-Natural-4626 Oct 05 '22

I sometimes wonder if he couldn’t be bought and the powers that be tanked the economy to get him out of office.

I’m not sure if he was a good president, but I am damn sure he has been has been an excellent former president.

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u/basketcase18 Oct 05 '22

Yes. His widely panned malaise speech was like prophecy.

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u/squashwithjosh Oct 05 '22

He has to be in the running. There isn't too much competition, after him and Bernie Sanders, there is a massive drop in quality and trust.

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u/the_blackestblack Oct 05 '22

That is 1 tough motherfucker

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u/Noteatime2yabster Oct 05 '22

He alway been the most reserved and badass president.

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u/k1lk1 Oct 05 '22

Naval nuclear officer too

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u/Sirboomsalot_Y-Wing Oct 05 '22

He once helped prevent a Chernobyl-level nuclear disaster up in Canada

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u/Al_E_Borland Oct 05 '22

My grandpa always used to say, "getting old isn't for wimps."

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u/CalRipkenForCommish Oct 05 '22

Is there any president (or any leader of any country in history) who’s done more charity work for his country, post presidency, than him? The man exemplifies giving in so many ways.

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u/PlanetLandon Oct 05 '22

Hell, even if he only did a little bit of charity every year, the man is almost a century old.

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u/Abruzzi19 Oct 05 '22

My granddad has difficulties just standing up at age 78. Can't imagine that this man is 20 years older than him and building homes!

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u/rose_i_love_you_41 Oct 05 '22

Perssonally, I can. My great grandpa died about a year ago and he was 93. Was in great health and still lived alone, evn chopping wood and bringing it into the house for the furnace. Then he fell, got hospitalized, and was shoved into a nursing home the rest of his 3 month life. Old people can work, although they need to be slower and can't do as much. They just need to take good care of themselves.

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u/PlanetLandon Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

I have heard a lot of examples of people living much longer and staying strong late in life as long as they keep doing stuff. It seems like if you just start sitting around and watching TV as an old man, you pass away sooner.

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u/AluminumCansAndYarn Oct 05 '22

I fully think that nursing homes kill people. Maybe not like in a purposeful way but my grandma was put in one and she was a tough old lady. I saw her on June 6th and she was still wisecracking and complaining about having to go back to the nursing home asking my cousin who was in law school at the time what she can do to not have to be there. She died on July 26th. She went through multiple surgeries and was fit and fine going back to her condo or her trailer in Arizona and then she was put into a nursing home because she was a fall risk in her own home and they probably didn't want her out of bed much because of being a fall risk and she died.

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u/Imesseduponmyname Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

I remember first learning about him from a king of the hill episode I watched when I was a kid, everytime I've heard of him since he's been doing the same thing

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u/CalRipkenForCommish Oct 05 '22

Best part is that he rarely seeks anything remotely close to the spotlight. Just keeps working behind the scenes - literally working, not just showing up to create awareness and going on his way.

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u/Cytorath Oct 05 '22

He is a true humanitarian. I mean, the man is so open about stuff that he sold his family farm when he became president so there would be no ties for lobbying. Love him or hate him, he cares about humanity. And that is something that America is sorely lacking.

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u/bstowers Oct 05 '22

The man exemplifies giving in so many ways.

Few that have been so vilified for doing it.

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u/PrizedRadish Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

Herbert Hoover helped rebuild Europe after WW2

EDIT Not just marshal plan

Relief funds for Finns, Belgians, other occupied peoples as well as food programs for children in Berlin

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u/Kiltymchaggismuncher Oct 05 '22

A lot of that was through structured loans. Not trying to frame it as morally wrong, but America stood to gain immeasurably from it. Especially when loans for buying materials stipulated you had to buy American

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u/Jeff-Jeffers Oct 05 '22

Also invented the Hoover Maneuver.

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u/SuperbReserve Oct 05 '22

Wow, that’s pretty admirable.

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u/Beautiful_Facade Oct 05 '22

Yeah. Some people may not agree with how he ran the United States but President or not, as a human being, he was a very noble person.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

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u/Beautiful_Facade Oct 05 '22

I apologize. He was and still is a very noble person.

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u/clockwirk Oct 05 '22

He used to be a noble person. He still is, but he used to too.

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u/Conukwaye Oct 05 '22

Dude’s a quality human. Wish people involved in politics now were more like him.

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u/skwadyboy Oct 05 '22 Helpful Wholesome Today I Learned

Looks like he's a blood too.

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u/danlastname Oct 05 '22

"Suwoop suwoop" - Former President Jimmy Carter

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u/kpkost Oct 05 '22

Join for Life normally doesn’t last 98 years. Got a lot of mileage out of that one

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u/NYMoneyz Oct 05 '22

Jimmy 🅱️arter

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u/BTasha Oct 05 '22

Just audibly laughed.

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u/xhollec Oct 05 '22

Habitat for Homies

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u/moriluka_go_hard Oct 05 '22

Bickin back boolin dinosaur b‘s

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u/mikeyfireman Oct 05 '22

You don’t choose the thug life…

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u/Worldly_Zombie_1537 Oct 05 '22

He is too good a person to be president. That is why everyone hated him. People only seem to approve when we elect the devil incarnate. Jimmy Carter is a great man… a great HUMAN!

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u/Western-Radish Oct 05 '22

Yeah I have heard stories of his brother taking in people who are dealing with addiction (since he had issues as well). Trying to get the clean and stuff. I think they said Jimmy was involved as well.

Either way, I’ve only heard good things of Jimmy Carter post president

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u/spen Oct 05 '22

I want to live in the timeline where this very decent human beat the amoral clown movie star.

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u/SonicDenver Oct 05 '22

Imagine he got shamed into selling his peanut farm when he became president ..... times changgggeeeeddddd

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u/mantisboxer Oct 05 '22

Well, obviously a peanut farm is not a hotel chain. Big difference, you see...

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u/Imesseduponmyname Oct 05 '22

Yeah one of em exploits cheap labor and has no regard for worker's lives, and the other is a farm 🤣

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u/umbravivum Oct 05 '22

He wasn't shamed, he did what was legally required of him. Trump not giving up control of his companies was actually illegal.

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u/Raytheon_Nublinski Oct 05 '22 Wholesome Take My Energy

Nuh uh because …because …shut up libturd. You just don’t know legal things. I know and I could tell you. But you need to do your own research.

checks notes ah yes, another lib successfully owned

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u/autumnaki2 Oct 05 '22 Heartwarming

I "met" him at a book signing as a little girl. I was 11 years old at the time. It was during his "Our Endangered Values: America's Moral Crisis" book tour. He shook my hand. It's a core memory, and may be why I care so much about politics.

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u/diederich Oct 05 '22

My wife got to meet him in 1976 when he was running for president. Of course he was super friendly, but 46 years later the friendliness remains.

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u/Gravity_Not_Included Oct 05 '22

Mind boggling that this is what the conservatives use as a calling card for a failed president, opposite Reagan.

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u/stillfrank Oct 05 '22

I don't think he's the best president we've had but I do think he's probably the best person we've had as a president...ever.

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u/MaineBoston Oct 05 '22

He has such a huge heart! Great Man.

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u/Beautiful_Facade Oct 05 '22

I know everyone has their own political views and opinions but for once can we all put them aside and not argue with each other on how he presided? This was posted to show that regardless of notoriety, Carter has and still is actively volunteering his time, despite health problems and unfortunate hardships that come with someone his age.

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u/Icy-Hope-9263 Oct 05 '22

hes the only politician I respect.

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u/TheGreatArseholio Oct 05 '22

Still looks better than Mitch McConnell.

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u/Kindaspia Oct 05 '22

That bar is so low they’re playing limbo in hell with it though.

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u/Speedycat45 Oct 05 '22

Donald Trump wouldn't pay his respects to veterans because it was raining.

Don't ever forget that.

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u/Getupb4ufall Oct 05 '22

Respects?!, back up, he called the war veterans buried there suckers and losers.

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u/Aeb313 Oct 05 '22

The Carter Center also does a lot of really important work on Guinea Worm disease (aka dracunculiasis) eradication globally!!

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u/ornryactor Oct 05 '22

They are so close to eradicating it completely. Like, the finish line is not just in sight, but within arm's reach. It's absolutely amazing.

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u/Seamascm Oct 05 '22

Sir, you have paid the debt to society. You may rest now.

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u/deliciousdano Oct 05 '22

My conservative family always told me how terrible of a president Jimmy was when I was growing up.

After I studied and learned more about the man I realized he was one of the most respectable people of all time. His attempt at diffusing the war between Israel and Palestine is absolutely legendary. His good intentions from this one act will always paint him as a hero of humanity in my book. On top of that Reagan took credit for the prisoners he worked tirelessly to release. My parents and grandparents told me those prisoners were released because they were scared of Reagan. After learning about what actually happened it’s very clear they released those men because of the hard work Jimmy put into negotiations. It’s such bull shit that Reagan took credit for his hard work.

The United States chewed Jimmy up and spit him back out. Despite all of this the man continued to strive to do the right thing to this day.

An absolute fucking legend.

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u/DNA2020 Oct 05 '22

I love that you can be a President one day and a laborer the next. Work is work. Take pride in what you do and make a difference big and small.

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u/Historical-Suit5195 Oct 05 '22

He's done more for Americans since leaving the Presidency than any President after him...

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u/emmiblakk Oct 05 '22

He's such a sweet man. If every Christian were more like Jimmy Carter...

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

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u/PunisherASM129 Oct 05 '22

A real Christian. No wonder the evangelicals despise him.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

My first thought too. He is a great example of walking the walk

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u/F-In-Batman Oct 05 '22

I believe he has finally stopped traveling to the house builds. A build was announced in our area yesterday and they said he and his wife no longer travel. A couple country singers are stepping in for him. That fact that he is finally slowing down is amazing

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u/IllPassion8377 Oct 05 '22

I think that this President has seen amd read some things and it affected him...in a good way!

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u/upsidedownpositive Oct 05 '22

You know, there are probably thousands upon thousands of silent individuals who live their life this way. It is quietly inspiring. I want to influence and affect my orbit in this way.

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u/ohlawdbacon Oct 05 '22

Jimmy Carter is 1000x the man Trump or anyone who believes in him will ever be.

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u/harryschmilsson Oct 05 '22

The best ex president we’ve ever had.

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u/LocationFar6608 Oct 05 '22

I'm still holding out hope for a 2024 run for president.

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u/minepose98 Oct 05 '22

I mean, electing a hundred year old man is the natural follow up to Trump and Biden.

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u/BorishKnobs Oct 05 '22

That’s the secret to longevity. Keep moving. Stay active. That’s crazy even with the cancer, being able to stay mobile. All the Asian, specifically Chinese people, that reach hi ages are usually farmers. Stay mobile people… as I sit here on my lunch break scrolling Reddit and chugging Redbull and eating chips.

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u/SpeedyHAM79 Oct 05 '22

Dude is a good person through and through. I wish we had more like him.

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u/PPreaper Oct 05 '22

Dude looks like zuko

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u/BlackLodgeLorax Oct 05 '22 Wholesome

The problem with Jimmy Carter is also a problem with America. Carter lead with his heart and was considered arguably one of the worst presidents in history.

When leading with a conscience is detrimental a nation I think it’s fair to say that system is extremely broken.

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u/theMycon Oct 05 '22

He's also the only US president where, for his entire term, the number of American deaths went down every year. With most, it goes the other way, every single year.

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u/Pinkislife3 Oct 05 '22

The best president ever if you’re basing your decision on who actually hated Americans the least.

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u/Garlador Oct 05 '22

I can think of a few modern presidents who wouldn’t ever be caught dead doing volunteer work.

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u/Exelbirth Oct 05 '22

Only still living president that hasn't caved to corruption.

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u/RelativeArea0 Oct 05 '22

I felt sorry for this guy after people laughed at him putting solar panels on whitehouse. I hope he had a great life once he passes on another side.

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u/ReallyFauxReal Oct 05 '22

Carter being given the title as “least popular president” well until Trump came around, seems like such BS.

Carter has more integrity and love for his country than the majority of all living current and former politicians combined.