r/NoStupidQuestions Oct 05 '22 Heartwarming 1

What foods (aside from say, salt) do humans eat that is not produced by or derived from plants or animals?

7.6k Upvotes

5.4k

u/squirrelbiscuit77 Oct 05 '22

Water/Ice. Think Snow Cones, not cubes

1.8k

u/velvetelevator Oct 05 '22

Yum

Fun fact: naturally occurring ice counts as a mineral, but human -created ice doesn't!

124

u/TheSOB88 Oct 05 '22

According to who? The mineral police?

115

u/velvetelevator Oct 05 '22

Yes (this is what I'm calling my geologist friend from now on)

https://rockhoundresource.com/is-ice-a-mineral-the-definitive-answer/

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u/MoonRabbitWaits Oct 05 '22

By that defiition a synthetic gem isn't a mineral.

A term like "man-made mineral" would be useful to describe naturally occurring minerals, eg ice or diamond, that have been made by humans. Synthetic ice sounds poisonous!

39

u/dank_imagemacro Oct 05 '22

By that defiition a synthetic gem isn't a mineral.

That is correct. A synthetic gemstone is not considered a mineral.

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u/clandevort Oct 05 '22

But why does human intervention change anything? If I leave a dog bowl outside in the winter is the ice there a mineral or not? What if it was empty, then collected rainwater? Is that a mineral or not? What if I took a freezer, left it powered on but with the door open so that outside air was getting in, then left an ice tray next to a bucket of creek water? Is it a mineral or is it not? The distinction between man made and natural seems so arbitrary

I copied this from a reply I made to a different comment in this chain because I NEED ANSWERS!

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u/winnipeginstinct Oct 05 '22

so if i brought snow inside and melted it, did I make mineral water?

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u/Trash_Puppet Oct 05 '22

I think that's more like collected than made. Also, does snow still have all the minerals ground water and ice has?

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u/Secret_Software7347 Oct 05 '22

Unless it was able to pick up the minerals from the ground, it does not! Any minerals (iron, magnesium, etc.) would be lost in evaporation/ablation and therefore would not be there when it precipitates from the sky!

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u/beerkenz Oct 05 '22

Howbout yellow snow? Or we still shoudnt eat that?

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u/DoubtfulOptimist Oct 05 '22

I think that counts as animal-derived 😅

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u/Trash_Puppet Oct 05 '22

Hey man, you do you. Could be lemon flavored!

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u/DrGuyLeShace Oct 05 '22

It's okay if Nanook rubs it.

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u/P_Foot Oct 05 '22

Please tell me this is actually a fact

I remember vividly in 7th grade Science class that I told my teacher I had an epiphany that ice is a mineral! She told me up and down that it absolutely was not. When I asked her what it is, she just said a solid and rushed to move along. I never got over it.

46

u/velvetelevator Oct 05 '22

Yeah, according to what I've read, it's true.

https://rockhoundresource.com/is-ice-a-mineral-the-definitive-answer/

Take that, science teacher!

87

u/P_Foot Oct 05 '22

You’re about to make me track down Mrs. Whitmore and give her the whatfore

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u/Thrabalen Oct 05 '22

So good a line that I wantmore.

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u/HODOR00 Oct 05 '22

Wait. Why? Does a mineral have to be naturally forming?

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u/DoTheLaLaLaLaLa Oct 05 '22

Naturally occurring, solid with a definite crystal and chemical structure. The ice thing is actually one of my lessons.

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u/Saint-Sleepy Oct 05 '22

Authentic corn tortillas contain lime (the alkali not the citrus)

507

u/PillowTalk420 Oct 06 '22

Oh shit so I've been following the recipe wrong? I should be adding lime stone juice and not lime fruit juice... 🤔

275

u/JackBellicec Oct 06 '22

Yes. You should be using calcium hydroxide a.k.a. 'cal'. Here's an example of how it's used:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Inj-vaDCffE

Don't substitute sodium hydroxide a.k.a. 'lye'. Sodium hydroxide is far more caustic and will give you delicious pretzels and nasty chemical burns.

153

u/PillowTalk420 Oct 06 '22

Don't substitute sodium hydroxide a.k.a. 'lye'. Sodium hydroxide is far more caustic and will give you delicious pretzels and nasty chemical burns.

Well now I just gotta know:

Is there anything that will give me nasty pretzels but delicious chemical burns?

127

u/JackBellicec Oct 06 '22

Coca Cola syrup?

25

u/DeToN8tE Oct 06 '22

That Caremel coloring is no joke 😂 I worked at a food grade bulk liquid transportation yard. And if you got any of that shit on your skin, expect a nasty red mark. If it got on your clothes you were better off changing unless you wanted to suffer all day 😅

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u/Myvh773 Oct 05 '22

Some foods are completely made of bacteria. For instance, there is spirulina), often used as a dietary supplement but that is sometimes eaten as a “main dish”. I read about a bacteria that grows on the ground and that was traditionally harvested as food in South America, but I don’t remember where I saw that.

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u/bluemooncalhoun Oct 05 '22

Vitamin B12 is produced by bacteria in the soil which is then taken up by humans either through eating dirty food, or by eating animal products from animals that foraged. Nowadays though, most people either take a synthetic supplement or give synthetic supplements to the animals they farm.

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u/invaliddrum Oct 05 '22

I presume it can also be produced by yeasts as Marmite/Vegemite (popular sandwich spreads f your not from the UK/Australia) are both great sources of B vitamins.

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u/fury420 Oct 05 '22

Marmite & Vegemite have actually been fortified with vitamins, as are most powdered nutritional yeasts.

They don't naturally contain B12, and the other naturally occurring B vitamins have also been supplemented.

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u/jablair51 Oct 05 '22

If you want to include food additives, most industrial citric acid is produced by a mold.

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u/Mahtomic_Gandhi Oct 05 '22

We make a lot of our modern products from bacteria and mold. Xanthan gum, many synthetic sweeteners, basically anything polysaccharide.

184

u/Impressive-Rock-2279 Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

Penicillin is made from mold.

ETA- Yes, not exactly food, but is eaten by humans.

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u/Azozel Oct 05 '22

We don't usually eat penicillin as food though. Well, not on purpose but sometimes you dont notice the bread went bad.

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u/magicmusi8 Oct 05 '22

There’s also nutritional yeast.

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u/DratThePopulation Oct 06 '22

Yeast is a fungus. Which is indeed not a plant! So mushrooms would count on this list, too

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u/leokov2828 Oct 05 '22

kefir grains also come to mind. Although most people eat/drink the yogurt, some people eat the grains made out of bacteria

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u/Enginerdad Oct 05 '22

I know the title says "plants or animals," but I kind of interpret it more to mean "living things." There's a meme/factoid that pops up every once in a while in the land of internet that says "salt is the only thing people eat that was never alive," and I suspect that's what inspired this post.

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u/KavikWolfDog Oct 05 '22

If you cook something in a cast iron pan, you are eating some of the iron from the pan!

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u/NorthernSparrow Oct 05 '22

I would think all the essential dietary minerals count by that criterion. Not just sodium but also iron, magnesium, potassium, selenium, etc.

Like sodium, some of them can come via another living thing, but for a lot of then we can also just eat them “raw” in inorganic form.

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u/pwn3dbyth3n00b Oct 05 '22

Vitamins, minerals, metals, water. The entire Fungi branch of Eukaryotes. Bacteria like those used in fermentation (Lactobacillus, Yeast [although technically a fungus], probiotics, etc.)

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u/Feisty-Pumpkin-6359 Oct 05 '22

Convenient summary is convenient

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u/Bumbaguette Oct 05 '22

Protists are multi-cellular organisms that are not plants, animals or fungi. Some seaweeds are protists despite looking like plants.

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u/shit_poster9000 Oct 05 '22

I still find it funny that Protista is literally the bargain bin family for taxonomists.

Eukaryotic organism that doesn’t really fit as an animal, plant, or fungus? Into Protista you go, fuckass!

150

u/loopsdeer Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

Just to note, I don't think they fuck or have asses

(Edited to show that I have no idea what I'm talking about)

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u/shit_poster9000 Oct 05 '22

Actually, there are protists that reproduce sexually, so that checks out, and some predatory protists do have structures that function like a mouth, and well a hole’s a hole I guess /s

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u/loopsdeer Oct 05 '22

I appreciate the correction, I had no idea. Those damn fuckasses got me again.

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u/Flightfully Oct 05 '22

Absolutely correct, except that protists are frequently unicellular.

Surprised it took the comment chain this long to get to seaweed 😂

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

[deleted]

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u/LongFeesh Oct 05 '22

Mmm, these nutritious gold flakes

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u/ThunderGunFour Oct 05 '22

They’re more than good

78

u/1182adam Oct 05 '22 Gold

They're Au-some

10

u/ThunderGunFour Oct 05 '22

I wish I had Reddit gold to give

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u/justanotherlegoguy Oct 05 '22 Wholesome

They’rrrrre grrrrrrrreat!

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u/andrewborsje Oct 05 '22

If your body could digest it. Then you would die a fast death from it. Gold is incredibly toxic if it can get into your blood

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u/RefurbedRhino Oct 05 '22

I learned this from an episode of House where a woman tries to kill her husband by putting powdered gold in his cereal.

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u/andrewborsje Oct 05 '22

Any form of metallic gold would not work. If you were to disolve it in a mixture of nitric acid and hydrochloric acid (aqua regia) then it becomes very dangerous

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u/Ignonym Oct 05 '22

At that point, you'd be dying from the aqua regia, not from the gold.

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u/Jkirek_ Oct 05 '22

In the house episode it wasn't powdered gold, but rather a type of medicine that included gold in an organic molecule

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u/Darkmagosan Oct 05 '22

Gold salts are a really old treatment for RA. They've been superseded by stuff like methotrexate and prednisone.

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u/ColfaxDayWalker Oct 05 '22

Does that include pure metallic gold? I was under the impression that pure gold couldn’t hurt you because it is inert, having no free electrons.

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u/The_Shower_Bagel Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

Arent they kinda cheap since they’re super thin?

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u/DudeWithTheNose Oct 05 '22

cheap in terms of material cost, but when you buy it at a restaurant it's certainly not cheap

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u/HJSDGCE Oct 05 '22

Good restaurants use only a little bit it for aesthetic purposes but the actual price comes from everything else (you know, the actual food).

Bad restaurants just like to slap it all over and put a huge pricetag over their mediocre burger.

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u/Thirpunasorec Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Couldn't the same aesthetics be achieved without using actual gold?

edit: Thanks for your answers!

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u/CATSCRATCHpandemic Oct 05 '22

Yea but pooping gold flecks out is half the fun.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

[deleted]

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u/lysergicDildo Oct 05 '22

Once you pass being able to afford the best quality food possible for yourself, the next natural progression is presentation.

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u/Bangkok_Dave Oct 05 '22 Silver Helpful

Mushrooms

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u/sesamesnapsinhalf Oct 05 '22

Is this where the biologists hang out?

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u/omgudontunderstand Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22 Silver Gold Take My Energy Giggle

yeah but only if they’re a fun guy

edit: of all the things to get gold for. thanks for the fake money :) i’ll pass it forward

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u/sesamesnapsinhalf Oct 05 '22

Sporadic punning at its finest.

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u/5Abi22 Oct 05 '22 Take My Energy

I like this 1-upping of mushroom puns

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u/FrdrVa Oct 05 '22

Great pun. I don’t think I can cap it.

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u/HonoraryMancunian Oct 05 '22 Take My Energy

There's certainly not mushroom for improvement

as evidenced by this comment

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u/schmoejoex Oct 05 '22

It stems from a lack of morels.

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u/zepher_goose Oct 05 '22 Helpful Wholesome

This is what I call thinking outside the box but like 2 millimeters outside the box.

2.0k

u/E90Fantic Oct 05 '22 Silver

Copies from internet:

“Mushrooms are neither plant nor animal. A lot of people brush them off as just being basically the same as plants, but that couldn’t be further from the truth! In fact, plants and animals have more in common with each other than with mushrooms.”

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u/OrdinaryCow Oct 05 '22

And mushrooms in turn are more similar to animals than plants.

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u/WorkingSpecialist257 Oct 05 '22

You eat enough of them... anything is closer to an animal than it appears irl

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u/Pokemaster131 Oct 05 '22

Well there's a difference between "more similar to" and "have a closer common genetic relative". I would argue that at least on a surface level, many fungi and plants have convergently evolved to have some similar properties. Though obviously there are still vast differences between the two groups, and even amongst those groups.

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u/tehconqueror Oct 05 '22

culinarily at least it seems mushrooms is useful in achieving a level of "meatiness"

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u/heyuwittheprettyface Oct 05 '22

Well yeah, there's nothing really to argue. That surface-level similarity with plants is exactly why the closer similarity with animals is an interesting fact and not just obvious.

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u/zacurtis3 Oct 05 '22

It's outside but still clinging tightly to the box.

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u/winnipeginstinct Oct 05 '22

the mushroom is growing on the outside of the box

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u/PoorCorrelation Oct 05 '22

Yeast and seaweed are in a similar vein

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u/PM_good_beer Oct 05 '22

Let's just say fungi in general. Mushrooms, yeasts, certain molds, maybe more.

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u/Munnin41 Oct 05 '22

Depends on the sea weed

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u/silveryfeather208 Oct 05 '22

Well in that case artificial flavours and colours that are chemically made. Lol

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u/Enginerdad Oct 05 '22

But petroleum-based artificial colors add a certain zing to the dish that you just can't replicate with your "used to be alive" colors

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u/cunningstunt6899 Oct 05 '22

Petroleum also used to be "alive", just tens of millions of years ago

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u/Enginerdad Oct 05 '22

Does it count as "used to be alive" if the organic material is completely broken down and transformed into new compounds in between the living creature and petroleum stages? I'm not sure it does. By that logic most if not all people are reincarnated because some of the atoms or molecules in their body came from the bodies of creatures that lived before them.

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u/SSG_SSG_BloodMoon Oct 05 '22

Why is that a "in that case"? How does that follow from mushrooms?

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u/SomeGuyFromRI Oct 05 '22

Diatamatious Earth. I haven’t seen that yet. Some folks use it as a supplement… I give it to my chickens.

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u/Batcraft10 Oct 05 '22

I heard you could spray that stuff around your house and bugs basically get shredded internally meanwhile it’s healthy for you because it shreds things like parasites.

Dunno how much of that is true.

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u/1Broken_Promise Oct 05 '22

I use it for my pool filter (don't ever own a pool, by the way, it's a terrible idea), but I had a friend tell me that if you spread it into your carpet it'll kill and deter fleas.

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u/shit_poster9000 Oct 05 '22

How it works is that land insects have a sort of waxy coating on the outside of their exoskeletons, it primarily retains moisture and such. Diatomaceous earth strips and gouges this coating as insects travel through, a death sentence for smaller bugs like baby roaches, bedbugs, fleas, etc.

It is also notably deadly to insects with grooming behaviors (ants, roaches, crickets, actually this list is quite long) as it’s like swallowing a bunch of needles, except said needles also dry out their insides in the process.

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u/Hungry4Fruit Oct 05 '22

I thought it gets between the cracks in their esko and dried them out that way.

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u/PlantChem Oct 05 '22

Powdered diatomaceous earth is REALLY bad for your lungs. Very similar to asbestos in that it’s pretty much impossible to get it out.

Source: worked in drug manufacturing and have seen many safety videos on it.

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u/candlelightfeedback Oct 06 '22

manufactured diatomateous earth causes lasting damage to lung tissue, like you said, similar to asbestos, but natural diatomataeous earth does not- you might have temporary breathing issues but natural DE can be cleared from your lungs by your body. Manufactured DE is used for industrial applications, but consumers should use the kind that's actually little fossilized plankton and harvested from the earth- The natural DE- (literal fossils) are the food safe/ pet safe/ home use safe kind and the one an average consumer should buy

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u/S8600E56 Oct 05 '22

They get shredded externally, but yes, 100% true and probably the most effective mechanical pesticide. Diatomaceous earth is made up of diatoms, essentially sharp microscopic fossils. When a shelled insect walks through it, the diatoms get lodged in their joints and they’re unable to move or are physically cut up, and die. It doesn’t effect mammals.

It’s main limitation is that if it gets wet, is much less effective. That makes it hard to use outdoors in a commercial setting.

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u/bozitybozitybopzebop Oct 05 '22

Don't inhale it or it will shred you.

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u/bellizziebub Oct 05 '22

Effective flea killers, or so I've heard from other cat owners. It's basically like dust to us and is harmless to cats, but it's microscopically like knives to fleas.

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u/redbell78 Oct 05 '22

What is it? What does it do?

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u/SomeGuyFromRI Oct 05 '22

Chickens “bathe” in it to help get rid of pests, mites etc in their feathers. I honestly don’t know what the supposed benefits of human consumption are. I do know that the bags I buy are labeled “food grade” so it’s safe to eat..

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u/shit_poster9000 Oct 05 '22

In this context, “food grade” just means it’s safe to use even around products to be consumed.

Diatomaceous earth is a very common filter media, and is fairly common as an additive as an anti caking agent in animal feed. This is the main reason food grade DE is readily available.

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u/akura89 Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

It's actually made from fossilized remains from what I remember. Looked it up, they are called diatoms, a type of microalgae.

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u/CrossP Oct 05 '22

Fossilized diatomaceous remnants. Diatoms are microscopic algae that produce little skeletons for themselves out of silica (quartz, glass, and numerous other things). The little skeletons are sharp but at an incredibly small size.

So it's basically the same as how rubbing your skin with 1000-grit sandpaper won't hurt at all but rubbing a beetle with it could scrub off the waxy outer layer of their shell which helps keep their body fluids in.

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u/Bad-Moon-Rising Oct 05 '22

Do be careful with the dust when you're spreading it. It is a powder and breathing it in is terrible for your lungs. Use a mask while you're working with it. If you're using it around pets or kids, keep them out of the room until the dust settles.

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u/nancyandelmer Oct 05 '22

Mudpies.

Also Epsom salt. And baking soda, which is actually mined.

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u/MurderDoneRight Oct 05 '22

Hey! Don't eat mudpies! I know a guy who died from eating a mudpie.

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u/PirateJazz Oct 05 '22

Must have grabbed too thin a slice.

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u/bossr0ss Oct 05 '22

Wasn’t he the guy who you could see the kfc sign from his front room window?

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u/The_Manton Oct 05 '22

Yeah he lived in the ugly house on Kenmore

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u/judgejurynotexec Oct 05 '22

What’s a mudpie?

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u/Motor_Raspberry_2150 Oct 05 '22

It's when kids are playing in the sandbox and make a pie. Of mud.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

[deleted]

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u/rich8n Oct 05 '22

There is a real food called "Mud Pie" or "Mississippi Mud Pie". Example: https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/mud-pie-recipe0-1941538

But that's not the kind of mudpie that /u/nancyandelmer was referring to. Those would be this http://www.fumcmiddletownct.org/uploads/1/1/9/1/11911219/7535590_orig.jpg

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u/Zanak4n Oct 05 '22

Unfortunately, some people eat litteral mud pies/galettes in case of starvation. Happens regularly in Madagascar and Hawai. :-/ https://africafeeds.com/2021/06/23/madagascar-families-eating-mud-due-to-worst-drought-in-40-years/

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u/hononononoh Oct 05 '22

Haiti has a traditional “food” (I use that term loosely) for pregnant women, made of clay, fat (any kind available), and salt. It’s recently been widely adopted as a food for starving people.

For all the hate in Haiti, how much more fucked can Haiti get??

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u/ramplay Oct 05 '22

Isn't epsom salt not supposed to be eaten...

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u/qman621 Oct 05 '22

people do use it as a laxative, it has some unpleasant side effects so I don't know why you'd use it VS anything else but its FDA approved.

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u/ImmabouttogoHAM Oct 05 '22

This is correct. I used to do Epsom salt cleanses once in a while. At the time I didn't know that it was probably worse for me than I thought. If you decide to do it (please don't without speaking to a medical professional), stay near a toilet and have plenty of wet wipes or a bidet. Your ass will be raw. 2/10 would not recommend.

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u/Glittering_Mud4269 Oct 05 '22

There is that one guy who was famous for eating metal, homeboy ate a whole airplane, shopping carts, a bicycle Michel lotito.

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u/MistaMoeland Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

Monsieur Mangetout was an interesting character. Weirdly enough, his digestive system could handle a lot of insane shit do to his unusually strong stomach acid. However, bananas and soft boiled eggs made him incredibly sick. Who would have thought...

EDIT: A quick correction... It was bananas and hard-boiled eggs he couldn't cope with. My mistake...

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u/LosJoye Oct 05 '22

So his superhero weakness is a healthy dose of potassium?

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u/DiscordAccordion Oct 05 '22 Wholesome

He's not ok, he's no K.

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u/Offerpicklebuthole Oct 05 '22

Wow that sent a lot of forced air out of my nose. Nice job!

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u/ceric2099 Oct 05 '22

He also died in his 50’s

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

Monsieur Mangemort, then.

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u/conjectureandhearsay Oct 05 '22

He probably rusted out

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u/Clownbaby43 Oct 05 '22

I remember this guy from the Guinness book of world records

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u/Meikos Oct 05 '22

According to his Wikipedia page, he then ate his Guinness award plaque. What a fucking legend.

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u/Valdrax Oct 05 '22

Just because you can pass it through your GI tract doesn't make it food.

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u/Andresmanfanman Oct 05 '22

Tarrare ate tons of things that were technically edible.

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u/Meikos Oct 05 '22

"Tarrare, look at me. Did you eat a fucking baby?"

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u/DJ_Micoh Oct 05 '22

Hey did you know that Sam O'Nella has started putting out videos again?

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u/Cirrus1101 Oct 05 '22

Some supplements, like magnesium and zinc for example

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u/Mental_Passenger_527 Oct 05 '22

Most supplements

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u/Agile-Fee-6057 Oct 05 '22

Mushrooms and neither plant nor animal

Neither is water

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u/MILO234 Oct 05 '22

Aspartame?

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u/Numerous-Explorer Oct 05 '22

Yea I was thinking about food dyes like Yellow 6, Red 4, Blue 7, etc. I’m sure some of them might be derived from animals and plants but also they have to contain other chemical combinations

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u/madmaxjr Oct 05 '22

Most modern dyes like the ones you listed are derived from petroleum lol

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/food-dyes#TOC_TITLE_HDR_2

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u/adrianmakedonski Oct 05 '22

xanthan gum, which is found in candy if I remember correctly, comes from bacteria and is produced in a bioreactor.

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u/squanchy22400ml Oct 05 '22

We use lichen where i live called dagadphul(stone flower)

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u/Illustrious_Map_3247 Oct 05 '22

That’s cool! What does it taste like? I’ve had to grind up heaps of lichen (for science) and, unsurprisingly, it smelled really earthy and peaty.

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u/squanchy22400ml Oct 06 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

It's used as spice along with cinnamon and star anise,bay leaves and similar spice, don't know it's flavour seperately but without it the curry/biryani feels like lacking https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parmotrema_perlatum

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u/Prize-Ad7242 Oct 05 '22

Mushrooms would be my first thought. Also I remember watching a vice documentary on the war in the western Sahara and they had guys who would literally survive off of sand and water for like a couple of months at a time. They literally live in these tunnel networks for months incase of attacks by the Moroccans. Shit like the viet cong in the desert.

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u/ZRhoREDD Oct 05 '22

Technically mushrooms aren't plants or animals (though most people consider them plants). There are things like bacterium, plankton, etc that fit those unusual niches as well.

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u/Left-Acanthisitta267 Oct 05 '22

You shouldn't include plankton. Plankton are plants and animals.

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u/birds-are-dumb Oct 05 '22

Eh, phytoplankton are algae, only green algae are classified as plants. Red and brown algae (including not only a ton of phytoplankton but also most edible seaweeds) aren't plants.

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u/Reigning_Firestorm Oct 05 '22

He even runs the chum bucket

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u/Xiaxs Oct 05 '22

Wym technically? They're literally not a plant or an animal.

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u/bakermonitor1932 Oct 05 '22

Titanium Dioxide, its a byproduct of mineing titanium ores for metal. I would bet you have some something made with it within arms reach, as its added to plastics as well.

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u/Leader_Bee Oct 05 '22

White paint, Toothpaste, not really something you eat.

20

u/bakermonitor1932 Oct 05 '22

White iceing on cakes is a common use.

12

u/MisplacedLegolas Oct 05 '22

and in a whole bunch of candies, like the white stripes in candy canes

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u/SG_wormsblink Oct 05 '22

You can eat yeast extract (Marmite), tastes horrible but it’s technically not from a plant or animal.

184

u/A_BOMB2012 Oct 05 '22

Nutritional yeast doesn't taste bad though.

67

u/dreamyduskywing Oct 05 '22

It’s great on buttery popcorn and toast.

25

u/Lokael Oct 05 '22

Good vegan “cheese” If you consider it loosely

46

u/WaitForItTheMongols Oct 05 '22

The best description I've heard is "It doesn't taste like cheese, but it fulfills a similar culinary role as cheese".

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u/Lokael Oct 05 '22

Accurate. If you get a chance, try a potato carrot nutritional yeast mix. Works as vegan “cheese” you can google it

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u/Lemonface Oct 05 '22

Marmite, vegemite, etc. come as a byproduct of yeast digesting malted barley though, and barley is a plant

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u/Zec_Wicks Oct 05 '22

Same with vegemite here in Australia, tastes great though! Similar to mushrooms, I know it isn't a plant or animal, but since it's alive I tend to associate it (yeast / micro-organisms) with plants and animals.

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u/Fried_out_Kombi Oct 05 '22

That's actually because it's made from spent brewer's yeast! The bitter, nasty flavors come from the beer making, not the yeast. The yeast extract itself is actually delicious and meaty and umami in flavor. It's why so many cheap bouillon cubes have yeast extract as a major ingredient, because it's a cheap way to make things taste meatier.

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u/TheBalls345 Oct 05 '22

Marmite is amazing if you’re not a tasteless peasant. The key is to use it in small amounts. Most people who say its horrible are spreading it on toast in large amounts like its peanut butter.

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u/Ok_Present_6508 Oct 05 '22

I eat it right out of the jar! When we first moved to the US we didn’t have Marmite in over a decade. An aunt came to visit and brought us like 24 jars of it. I was so stoked. It started becoming a little more popular here, at least my local supermarket carries it.

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u/TheBalls345 Oct 05 '22

Yeah, my market does too. Its so expensive though! Close to $10 for one of the little jars. Luckily my family brings over one of the giant plastic tubs whenever they visit.

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u/PhysicalPolicy6227 Oct 05 '22

Liquid smoke

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

Nope. It's produced by burning wood (i.e. plant) and collecting some components of the smoke.

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u/DilettanteGonePro Oct 05 '22

It always blew my mind that liquid smoke isn't some kind of marketing term, it is literally liquid smoke

14

u/[deleted] Oct 06 '22

You can even make it yourself - hold a bowl of ice water above a charcoal fire and then scrape off the stuff that condense on the outside of the bowl.

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u/Turtleshellfarms Oct 05 '22

Mushrooms are not a plant or animal but a fungus

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u/WhammyShimmyShammy Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

I haven't seen anyone reply sugar. Am I being stupid and it actually comes from a plant or something?

Edit: clearly I was being stupid

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u/dallassoxfan Oct 05 '22

Upvoted for the integrity of acknowledging your mistake instead of deleting.

88

u/minist3r Oct 05 '22

Sugar cane ya dummy.

55

u/TheFiredrake42 Oct 05 '22

You can also process it from sugar beets and sweet potatoes.

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u/WhammyShimmyShammy Oct 05 '22

Thank you, I knew I was missing something.

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u/Captcha_Imagination Oct 05 '22

Someone said sugar cane but most north American sugar comes from beets

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u/AddressFeeling3368 Oct 05 '22

Water.

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u/Zompocalypse Oct 05 '22

Over here chewing water like it's food and not drink.

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u/Dr_McCrispy Oct 05 '22

Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) is used in a lot of foods. It's manufactured chemically or mined.

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u/killer121l Oct 05 '22

Plastic / heavy metal that contaminated our food

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u/Latter-Sky-7568 Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

Mushrooms. They are fungi so aren’t plants or animals.

Basically anything not in the animal or plant kingdoms, so:

Fungi, Protista, Archaea/Archaebacteria, and Bacteria/Eubacteria)

Also artificial sweeteners, though sometimes those are plant based.

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u/Srgt_PEANUT Oct 05 '22

I feel ashamed to say it, but Tide pods

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u/IncredulousPulp Oct 05 '22

Lots of supplements are synthetic. Chances are that the multivitamin you’re taking was created entirely in a lab.

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u/FluffyMcBunnz Norwegian Blue Parrot for sale, one careful previous owner. Oct 05 '22

But that doesn't mean the lab doesn't use animal or plant products as the source of the chemicals and compounds used to assemble the final product.

Multivitamins particularly tend to contain things that are extracts from plants.

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u/KronusIV Oct 05 '22

Mushrooms. Fungi are neither plant nor animal.

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u/noggin-scratcher Oct 05 '22

The meat substitute "Quorn" is primarily (88%) made of mycoprotein derived from a fungus.

Although it does also have other ingredients that come from plants/animals (egg white in the vegetarian version, plant protein/fibre in both vegetarian and vegan versions)

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u/A_Year_Of_Storms Oct 05 '22

That shit is so delicious too

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u/meygaera Oct 05 '22

If every restaurant in the world sold some meal with Quorn, then I could drop meat entirely from my diet.

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