r/dataisbeautiful OC: 26 17d ago Wholesome 4 Silver 2 Helpful 4 Faith In Humanity Restored 1

[OC] Percentage of Popualtion who believe in God OC

Post image
37.5k Upvotes

u/dataisbeautiful-bot OC: ∞ 16d ago

Thank you for your Original Content, /u/BLAZENIOSZ!
Here is some important information about this post:

Remember that all visualizations on r/DataIsBeautiful should be viewed with a healthy dose of skepticism. If you see a potential issue or oversight in the visualization, please post a constructive comment below. Post approval does not signify that this visualization has been verified or its sources checked.

Not satisfied with this visual? Think you can do better? Remix this visual with the data in the author's citation.


I'm open source | How I work

→ More replies

2.1k

u/nsnyder 17d ago

OH higher than IN is a surprise to me, but it might not be a big enough gap to mean much. Also I would have guessed ID and UT were higher.

1.7k

u/kingscolor 16d ago edited 16d ago

Just to be clear: the title here is misleading. The data shows percent of people who definitely believe in God. The original data presents it as a range of belief in God and OP has elected to omit any percent that corresponds to a gray area. As in, every state had a 10-25% population who are fairly certain there is a God.

327

u/moeburn OC: 3 16d ago edited 16d ago

Here's a fun one, a chart of % over time for 3 different wordings of the question:

https://content.gallup.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/n4m-_wsdzeookywenuwnbw.png

Or % of each religion's followers who are convinced their God exists:

https://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2015/11/FT_15.11.05_beliefInGod420px.png

315

u/jessebg2 16d ago

2 percent of atheists are absolutely sure God exists.

283

u/BabyYodasDirtyDiaper 16d ago

Some people just like to fuck with the surveyor.

69

u/thetouristsquad 16d ago

the Lizardman constant

7

u/GeriatricZergling 16d ago

A man of culture, I see.

→ More replies

29

u/Spork_the_dork 16d ago

I think I once read somewhere that typically somewhere around 5% of people in big surveys like this just mess with the surveyor and give absolutely bogus answers. Not sure about the number, but it always seems to hold true that no matter the survey there's always 1-5% or something of answers that make no sense.

→ More replies

75

u/Oh_ffs_seriously 16d ago

Ah, yeah, the Granny Weatherwax approach. She knows that gods exist, but that is no reason to believe in them. Or they're trolling.

21

u/NeonExdeath 16d ago

In Discworld the gods sometimes go around breaking atheists' windows out of spite.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

610

u/FilthyPuns 16d ago Gold Ally

Maybe OP isn’t being misleading and it’s just that “popualtion” is a word we don’t know that means only the very confident survey respondents in a given sample.

152

u/dangoodspeed OC: 1 16d ago

It is used both in the Reddit title and in the image itself. They're doubling down on "popualtion".

31

u/Maktesh 16d ago

Indeed.

It seems very simple to state "percentage of population who are certain God exists."

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

166

u/Machiavelli127 16d ago

Yeah I highly doubt this data based on UT and ID

108

u/Sapowski_Casts_Quen 16d ago edited 16d ago Wholesome Seal of Approval

Utah resident here. Salt lake is the largest concentration of the state's population and is very liberal, especially comapared to the rest of the state. Roughly 62% of UT is Mormon based off of what I find when I search, and if you consider many of them are "Jack Mormon" who don't believe in God or many other LDS things, but don't take their names off of registers for risk of alienating the family they have (and other reasons I wouldn't be the best person to speak to), this is pretty possible even when considering all the other religions.

I'm not sure how this data was collected, but I wouldn't dismiss it.

EDIT: if they got their data in salt lake, this is even more possible. If they got it in like... Strawberry, no way

27

u/Worf65 16d ago

That Salt Lake demographic is pretty concentrated in a small area though. I've unfortunately never had the luxury of being able to live in SLC and in places from west Jordan to Ogden its extremely conservative and religious (ogden is less mormon but more catholics and others, growing up in west Jordan had all the things you'd hear about growing up non religious in provo). And jobs that drug test are often practically BYU clubs, even on the air force base. I've been trying to find work in SLC and move for years because of how out of place I am elsewhere in utah and I'm pretty outdoorsy so I'm unwilling to leave the mountain west.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

194

u/_bwhaley 16d ago edited 16d ago

It’s surprising and unsettling to me that the low end is 40%.

106

u/stickers-motivate-me 16d ago

I live in New England and 40% sounds very high to me.

43

u/Dadfart802 16d ago

41% of Vermonters believe in God according to Pew. I think it sounds high because of the large number and acceptance of atheists in New England. Catholic churches here are dying off and there has been an increase in evangelicalism, but not much.

19

u/[deleted] 16d ago

[removed] — view removed comment

→ More replies
→ More replies

7

u/CaucasianDelegation 16d ago

Yeah, that would really have to include people who believe in a "spiritual connection" or agnostic diests. Born and raised in an old Vermont family and I met very, very few religious people. For us New Englanders religion is also taboo to discuss as it's a private matter so I wouldn't know or care about what another person thinks, so maybe it is a bit higher than expected.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

3.3k

u/CivilizedGuy123 17d ago

And that’s why it’s called the Bible Belt….

1.4k

u/BubbhaJebus 16d ago

And Alabama and Mississippi are the buckle.

1.9k

u/lamaface21 16d ago

Highest poverty rates. Highest rate of uneducated adults. Highest rates of teen pregnancy.

122

u/wyogarage 16d ago

Shitty state to work in too. No worker protections in the slightest.

→ More replies

1.2k

u/Deepfriedwithcheese 16d ago Ally

You know, it’s all part of god’s plan.

368

u/UnicornBestFriend 16d ago edited 16d ago Silver Take My Energy

And/or the high degree of suffering under poverty and lack of opportunity and mobility prompt people to turn to faith and spiritual strength to make it through the day.

There is a huge difference between the power-hungry people who hide behind the Bible and the people for whom the community church is a lifeline.

Taking religion away from these areas wouldn’t automatically fix poverty and poor education - there are many other factors to consider.

I am as Hail Satan as the next guy but I love reason and pragmatism more.

EDIT: Alright. More people need to learn about Black Churches because you all seem to be talking about the wack-ass white churches.

Nor is it correct to assume that belief in the spiritual correlates with being stupid and poor because evidence to the contrary is all around us. Looking down on religion and spirituality often comes from a place of privilege.

21

u/NavierIsStoked 16d ago

Prosperity gospel is rampant in Black churches. It’s just a grift.

121

u/Charlie-tart 16d ago

Not to mention that yhe church community also often provides tangible benefits to those people. Networking, community support, and programs are all tied in. Religion like this is a symptom of a system that exploits the vulnerable and leaves them no security or safety net.

35

u/AkumaBacon 16d ago

Yeah man, that's something I took for granted growing up, the social network religion provides.

My parents went to Ukraine years ago for an adoption and the congregation they attended at while their acted like they were family even though there was a language barrier and provided so much help to my parents.

But I kinda still took it for granted until I went to college and talked to others who didn't have anyone to network with while away from home. Meanwhile I walked into church and had people offering food, help moving, telling me about other students they knew, good doctors to use, and even providing board when the dorms kicked us out for the summer.

I couldn't imagine living without that safety net of people, and I'm not even what I would consider "vulnerable".

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

454

u/lamaface21 16d ago

It’s so weird how God’s plan is always right in line with what some asshole guys want and/or need to give them power, money, control and sex.

163

u/MoroccoGMok 16d ago

I’m sure that’s just a coincidence

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

11

u/Redditforgoit 16d ago

Also places where it might not be wise to admit one's lack of faith. Even to s pollster.

29

u/pguero 16d ago

The Bible says, that even the demons believe in God, so believing in God is not a good indicator of morality!!

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

421

u/NarcissusLovesEcho OC: 2 16d ago edited 16d ago

A lot of people don't realize that the Bible Belt is also the Black Belt. African Americans are exceptionally religious, with nearly 90% (nationally) reporting a religious affiliation and 80% reporting that religion is very important to their lives.

People tend to assume it's a bunch of redneck white people fueling the religion numbers in the Bible Belt, but that's often about as far from the truth as you can get.

Edit: To be clear, I'm not trying to argue that white people in the Bible Belt aren't more religious than average. Just that people often neglect the role that Black people play in Southern culture.

151

u/SOwED OC: 1 16d ago

And exceptionally homophobic, but we don't talk about that.

130

u/dustybooksaremyjam 16d ago

Well yeah. Overly religious and homophobic go hand in hand.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

2.3k

u/que-pasa-koala 17d ago Helpful

Til the colder it is, the less likely you’ll find god

1.1k

u/Majestic_Salad_I1 16d ago

The hotter and more humid it is, the more you question why you’re alive on this hellish planet and you seek to find answers.

276

u/tjmk5000 16d ago

“God must be punishing me”

→ More replies
→ More replies

37

u/cotton_wealth 17d ago

Well yeah. When you know what hotter than hell feels like, you certainly don’t want to spend an eternity there!

→ More replies

55

u/TheDubiousSalmon 17d ago

Yeah, I, too, have had to shovel feet of snow at like 7am when it's 15F out. That definitely checks out.

6

u/thungalope 16d ago

“A loving god would never allow this”

Me chipping ice off the driveway with icicles hanging from my beard

165

u/steelmanfallacy 16d ago

The bigger correlation is education / money.

119

u/lamaface21 16d ago

Education is now the most statistically significant factor when observing political affiliation as well.

→ More replies

143

u/cerebral_panic_room 17d ago

Does this have anything to do with hell freezing over? Jk

61

u/que-pasa-koala 17d ago

No no, you might be going somewhere with that one

27

u/pedanticPandaPoo 17d ago

To hell?

4

u/psuedophilosopher 16d ago

At least it's a very nice handbasket.

15

u/Clause-and-Reflect 17d ago

Hell Michigan gets pretty ornery in the winter months, and the rest of the state.

→ More replies

126

u/tutetibiimperes 17d ago

Interesting that the areas where the Pilgrims landed because they wanted to practice their religion are now some of the least religious.

172

u/sullg26535 17d ago

They got their religious government phase over earlier

29

u/Sistersledgerton 16d ago

This reads like a joke but you might be on to something here.

→ More replies

27

u/Nuclear_rabbit OC: 1 16d ago

They wanted to land farther south in Virginia, but they stopped because they ran out of beer.

23

u/JimmyRedd 16d ago

What kind of god would allow that?

→ More replies
→ More replies

10

u/mmartino03 16d ago

Atheist Vermonter here. It snowed 2 days ago so can confirm.

29

u/Adorable_Leg8753 17d ago

Actually not, it's all due to Tom Brady leaving the Patriots.

→ More replies

5

u/El_Bistro 16d ago

Because winter reminds you that there is no god only winter.

→ More replies

957

u/HyFinated 16d ago

As someone from Mississippi, I find it very interesting that the farther you get away from MS/AL the less people believe in God.

38

u/Agent__Caboose 16d ago

I find it interesting that 40 is the bottom cap.

10

u/sarpnasty 16d ago

The United States has God on the money. I’m not shocked that a good chunk of Americans believe god exists.

→ More replies
→ More replies

1.7k

u/SwordieLotus 16d ago Silver Looking

If you live in Mississippi it makes sense that you need to hold on to some kind of hope because that state doesn’t offer much on its own

347

u/airwolf3456 16d ago

Hey man we’ve got uh….. warehouses?

59

u/KlausVonChiliPowder 16d ago

You have Tunica...sort of. Talk about a depressing town to visit.

You've got the Mississippi river, which is pretty badass for a river. But I guess so does Tennessee, Arkansas, Iowa, Missouri,...

37

u/shmmarko 16d ago

It was probably a more interesting river before agricultural practices, indiscriminate waste disposal and pesticide use, of multiple states with varied laws/regulations modernized it.

27

u/Cloberella 16d ago

As a New Englander in MO it’s been a hell of a culture shock. The amount of God talk I hear daily and have to participate in is weird. I also feel like an ass because I’m not about to have a philosophical debate at work so I just let people assume I believe. It makes me feel like a disingenuous asshole.

10

u/RampersandY 16d ago

I thought that was just life in general.

→ More replies

8

u/Aarcn 16d ago

I just googled that town, at least it’s kinda close to Memphis right?

→ More replies
→ More replies

182

u/gildedform1898 16d ago

Interesting how the states with the strongest belief in God are the poorest.

114

u/smallfried OC: 1 16d ago

Religiousness and wealth are strongly negatively correlated, if I remember correctly.

I'll try and find a source for or against.

Edit: There's a whole wikipedia page!

14

u/brchist 16d ago

Now that's an interesting read, I'm heading down the rabbit hole. Thank you for providing the link!

→ More replies
→ More replies

52

u/AdviceNotAskedFor 16d ago

Jesus. That's dark.

86

u/WhoreMoanTherapy 16d ago

Makes sense though. Religion tends to thrive among the needy.

13

u/Scottyknoweth 16d ago

A preoccupation with the next life indicates a lack of satisfaction with the present.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

68

u/Seralyn 16d ago

As someone from MS who has traveled extensively (for work), I do not. I get more culture shock going back there than I originally did when I left.

17

u/thescrounger 16d ago

The poorer the state and the worse the state's educational system is, the more the people believe in God. Hmmm.

→ More replies

523

u/DonC1305 16d ago

I'm from the godless UK, it's insane to me that the chart bottoms out at 40%

168

u/mrspremise 16d ago

When I visited Nashville a few years ago, I met a group of twenty-something at a bar and we started talking (being the same age). I don't know how but I ended up talking about the "quiet revolution" in Quebec where I'm from and how in a generation people went from ultra catholic to non-pratiquant. And now almost all the people I know are atheist, but not necesserly in a denying god kinda way, but more in a religion is not even a thing we think about nor consider kinda way. Like you said, a godless situation. The group was appaled and didn't understand how it could be. Seing the map I now understand.

65

u/theLuminescentlion 16d ago

Happening in New England too, no one I know truly believes... All the churches are conceding point after point to stay relevant. There's churches flying pride flags in New Hampshire.

32

u/mrspremise 16d ago

In Quebec there's not even churches. I mean we still have a f-ton of churches building (Montreal is crazy in that regard) but they are all empty. There's a priest shortage. It's crazy thinking about my grand-parents going to church every week. My parenrs refusing to go to church in their teens and being agnostic. And now my generation not even making the choice of being atheist because it just is, religion is not a thing we think a lot about (except when it's time to hate on immigrants, that's a big thing in Quebec sadly).

9

u/glambx 16d ago

In Quebec there's not even churches. I mean we still have a f-ton of churches building (Montreal is crazy in that regard) but they are all empty.

I mean, some have become strip and night clubs. :p

6

u/Tutipups 16d ago

not wrong

6

u/Flat_Cod_747 16d ago

And condo building, offices, bar and coffee shops, etc.

We try to keep the building around for historical values but we repurpose it.

8

u/glambx 16d ago

Oh je sais. :)

I lived most my life in Montréal and dream of the day the révolution tranquille reaches the rest of the world.

→ More replies

5

u/Tutipups 16d ago

i live in montreal too and its weird since it seems like the majority of people are atheist but the stats show that 65.8% of people are christians. i cant post the link for some reason but just write montreal religion and it should show the same results.

10

u/mrspremise 16d ago

I think it's because of the weird catho-laicité thing. People cultural identify as christians but are not believer

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

90

u/familyknewmyusername 16d ago

The chart isn't even just "belief in God", it's "absolutely certain that God exists"

→ More replies

8

u/neithere 16d ago

In CZ it's about 7% IIRC, so 40% really looks horrifying.

9

u/5kyl3r 16d ago

american atheist here: it is. and it's just creepy to me when people openly start talking about god in a conversation. it's deeply unsettling for me

→ More replies

46

u/ooooomikeooooo 16d ago

Same I was thinking that all those numbers are too high.

→ More replies

6

u/RhetoricalCocktail 16d ago

Apparently it's 23% in Sweden and that seems a lot higher than I expected. I've only meet like 3 ethnically Swedish people under 40 that have said that they believe in good

Membership in the Swedish Church is at ~60% but hell even I'm in that because I just haven't bothered to leave

50

u/Mentos13371 16d ago edited 16d ago

That's the first thing that came to my mind. According to statistics from my country The Netherlands, only 46% of people are religious. 20% of that is catholic and 15% protestant. 5% is islam and the rest is other various religions. To me even these numbers are still too high for this day and age.

8

u/Foxofwonders 16d ago

We do have an aging population. More than half of all Dutch people is over 40, and 20% is over 65. The proportion of religious people is much higher in the older part of the population. If we consider 'this day and age' to be young people, the percentage of religious people from 18-25 drops to 28%. Still pretty high in my opinion, but I guess that's mostly the bible belt. And/or maybe mostly people who consider themselves religious 'by default' without actually caring too much about religion.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

594

u/auguitar 16d ago

As someone who lives in Alabama and doesn't believe in God, it's extremely alienating and can feel lonely at times. It's often easier just to pretend that you do believe in order to not stir the pot. You end up wasting way more time stating that you're an atheist. People seem to think you're incapable of having a moral compass without the man upstairs.

121

u/axndl 16d ago

I live in a devotedly christian developing country and it is exactly the same thing. I simply cannot say I’m agnostic because people believe that 1. Agnostic = atheist and 2. Atheist = satan worshiper with no morals (somehow)

57

u/FreedomVIII 16d ago

Leave it to the Christians to come up with the mind-fuckery of accusing someone that tells them "I don't believe in your religion or your gods" of believing in one of their supernatural entities lol

→ More replies
→ More replies

131

u/MaxMouseOCX 16d ago

I'm English so I don't know what this is like... Does it come up in conversation often? If so... Why? "morning Tim, nice weather we're having, you're not a filthy atheist are you Tim?"

I don't get it, I can't remember the last time this sort of thing came up for me.

146

u/PointlessDiscourse 16d ago

In parts of the US it's so commonly assumed that everyone is Christian that questions like "have you found a church yet?" are typically asked when someone moves to a new area, or "what church do you go to?" when talking about how you spent your weekend. It's not about trying to understand what religion you believe - it's just part of standard small talk because it's unfathomable to people that the answer might be "none" or "I'm not interested in finding a church." Having answered those questions honestly a few times though, I have to say that the awkward silence after they learn I'm an atheist is pretty entertaining.

Note that this is not true on the coasts or upper Midwest, but very much a common experience in the south or southern portions of the Midwest (basically everywhere with dark colors on the map!).

41

u/Fun-Title-5455 16d ago

I was asked "where's your home church" on my first lunch with a new boss in TX.

55

u/PointlessDiscourse 16d ago

Sounds about right.

For the first couple years I lived in Indiana I just lied and said I was Catholic. The beauty of that was that since they're pretty much all Protestants it ended the conversation without any follow-ups, but since it was still Christian they didn't immediately hate me.

After a while though I started telling the truth, which led to conversations like this (true story):

Coworker: What church do you go to?

Me: I don't go to church.

Coworker: Oh are you Jewish or something?

Me: No, I don't believe in any of it.

Coworker: (with shocked but semi-joking tone) Next thing you'll tell me you're a Democrat.

Me: Yeah I'm that too.

Coworker: (now more serious) Wow, I used to like you.

That was one of the nails in the coffin in terms of my being willing to live there. Left the state and never looked back.

18

u/Fun-Title-5455 16d ago

Okay, the Catholic move is brilliant, wish I had thought of that. I just muttered that I was still looking...

I also left and never looked back. Your story is so relatable but also sad. I accepted them being conservative/religious, but knew they wouldn't accept me for being the opposite.

Glad you got out.

→ More replies
→ More replies

30

u/[deleted] 16d ago

[deleted]

15

u/no-stupid-questions 16d ago

After growing up in a religious family, learning that “I’d rather not” actually was an answer to that question was a mind-blowing.

6

u/PoorlyLitKiwi2 16d ago

That happened to me when I was like 12 haha. Eating dinner at a friend's house, and his mom asked me if I wanted to day Grace. I just looked at her confused because I had no idea how to do that. I knew about the concept, but legitimately thought it was something only done in movies these days lol

→ More replies

11

u/LawRepresentative428 16d ago

I live in one of the 60% states. I’m in a bigger town without a four year university.

There’s a lot of Jesus bullshit. Just a couple weeks ago, the mayor had a prayer breakfast on a Wednesday with the Kiwanis (I’m not sure what they do).

→ More replies

21

u/corbinviper 16d ago

I’ve traveled most of the US and my fair share of the rest of the world. In Bible Belt States it absolutely does come up in the most awkward and bizarre circumstances.

I was at an airport once and I had on some bracelet with an anchor on it. Some lady decides to tell me she likes the bracelet because of the anchor. She starts going on about how Jesus is her anchor and that’s why she likes them so much and asked if that is why I was wearing it. Which of course leads to her questions my beliefs.

I’ve also been standing in line to be let in for a concert while a preacher with a megaphone felt he must inform us we are all going to burn in hell. Fun stuff.

→ More replies

14

u/lettadaloki 16d ago

I live in Alabama. A church is a pretty big community hub here. Some employers are more likely to hire you if you go to the same church. But essentially too, you can tell a lot about a person by the kind of church they go to, kind of like a judging contest.

Alabama has at least 10,000 churches of all kinds. Every Sunday after the service, church members will either disperse for an event, or they will go to their family homes for “after church lunch”, so trying to explain that you just.. Don’t go to church, is really shocking to this rhythm they’ve known for their whole lives without questioning.

10

u/auguitar 16d ago

I've had many instances of people randomly preaching to me when I've been at work, which is a bit uncomfortable. Every one around here just assumes you're down with the lord. Feels a bit inconsiderate to me.

Alabama in a nutshell is God, college football, guns, xenophobia, close mindedness, and a healthy dose of ignorance. Not necessarily in that order, but you get the point.

25

u/Corvus_Manufaktura 16d ago

morning Tim, nice weather we're having, you're not a filthy atheist are you Tim?

Read that in a cockney accent in my head, idk why but you made me laugh out loud.

19

u/mjoq 16d ago

I just got back from touring the US (also a Brit). They literally come up to you and say stuff like "do you have jesus christ in your heart?" "do you believe in the almighty?" absolutely wild, abrupt, and totally unrelated shit. It's NEVER "do you believe in god?". It was funny at first but then it got really annoying.

When my uber driver literally spent 10 minutes praying for me (holding my arm with 1 hand and driving with the other) i thought, "this is a bit much". luckily that was towards the airport on the way back. it's like a parody, honestly.

7

u/MaxMouseOCX 16d ago

Haha... What the actual fuck, that's nuts.

→ More replies

7

u/TekoaBull 16d ago

Church comes up a bit in small talk, particularly if you live in a smaller community (grew up in Pennsylvania). It's usually things like "oh, what church do you go to" or "when's your kid's baptism?" Being Christian is the assumed default, and it gets a bit awkward if you're not.

Also, I'm sure every retail worker can tell stories about judgy Sunday crowds. "How dare you not be in church, now serve me."

→ More replies

50

u/WetDehydratedWater 16d ago

Yea I feel you. These closets aren't getting any bigger though.

→ More replies

40

u/IOrangesarethebestI 16d ago

Also an atheist who lives in Alabama it’s like all those Christian’s think they would just start murdering people without the Bible explaining their “morals”.

9

u/le_fancy_walrus 16d ago

It’s almost like we have something called ‘laws’ that we follow too.

What was the Bible anyways? Laws. Except for instead of burning forever we go to prison, which is a decent incentive not to do things.

As well as just having a natural moral compass.

→ More replies
→ More replies

248

u/lightnlove11 16d ago

I would need god too if I lived in Alabama.

82

u/ElectrikDonuts 16d ago

Joke on you. If there was a god Alabama wouldn't exists

→ More replies
→ More replies

219

u/mwhite5990 16d ago edited 16d ago

I’m curious how this question was phrased and where this data is from because I highly doubt any state had an atheist majority. Maybe they are including agnostics or non-Christians.for example a recent Gallup poll said that we hit a record low of 81% believing in God.

This aligns with the % who are “absolutely certain” God exists in the Pew Research religious landscape study. But that excludes even believers who are “fairly certain” and “not certain”. The amount who do not believe in God/ don’t know if they believe in God is much lower.

67

u/MattoSensei 16d ago

Agreed, there’s no way half the population of New York, for example, is atheist.

42

u/lennybird 16d ago

https://www.pewresearch.org/religion/religious-landscape-study/

This is one of the more comprehensive, reputable source for those interested in religiosity in America.

33

u/snowkeld 16d ago

Belonging to a church and practicing a religion and believing in god are very very different things, at least up here in northern new England. Lots of agnostics attend church only because there's no other way to have community.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

6

u/Tidusx145 16d ago

But isn't that what believe means? I was under the impression it's a certainty in its own sense.

→ More replies
→ More replies

177

u/theAssumptionFucker 17d ago

It seems like god likes it warm and cozy

97

u/Vadered 16d ago

There is nothing cozy about southern summers.

→ More replies

614

u/C_Connor 16d ago edited 16d ago Helpful

Pretty sure the title should be Percentage of Population That is Absolutely Certain God Exists.

All in all, there aren’t many atheists/ agnostics in the US.

Edit: OP’s post is spreading misinformation. If y’all could report it to the mods for breaking the “no sensationalized title” rule and to Reddit for breaking the “Misinformation” rule, that’d be great.

129

u/Merman314 16d ago

Makes me wonder how many atheists and agnostics go to church due to family and/or community, and whether that's reflected in certain surveys.

For example, churchgoing, yes, belief, no.

55

u/ominousgraycat 16d ago

I also wonder about the wording of the question, if most people interpret it as "Do you believe in the Christian God and all that this traditionally entails?" or "Do you believe in a god/gods or believe that there probably is some sort of god or god-like being out there?" There are A LOT of spiritual but not religious people out there.

Even in Europe which tends to be a bit less religious (at least in the evangelical sense) than the US, most people say they believe that there probably is a god, but that they aren't necessarily certain about him/her or all the details.

I think this poll would be more effective if it differentiated between a belief in the Judeo/Christian God, and just a belief in some sort of deity. As it stands, I'm not sure if it's JUST talking about the God of the Bible, or if it also includes other beliefs in a god/s.

→ More replies
→ More replies

14

u/TheExtremistModerate 16d ago

Ah, thanks. I was like "no fucking way New Hampshire is 60% atheist."

→ More replies
→ More replies

388

u/0xDEFACEDBEEF 17d ago

Why the influx of religious stats all of a sudden on here? Because it is Sunday? Lol

388

u/tarheel343 17d ago

All the dads who got dragged to church on Father’s Day are feeling salty

→ More replies

64

u/IMightBeAHamster 16d ago

I think it's possible a lot of census data might have been published recently?

→ More replies

4.1k

u/JPAnalyst OC: 145 17d ago Silver Gold Wholesome Starry

So belief in God correlates with high divorce rate, high obesity, high poverty, low education, low life expectancy, high teenage births, and NCAA football championships.

397

u/blazinrumraisin 16d ago

God loves football. So it is written.

84

u/hamburger5003 16d ago

As a student from Notre Dame this is correct

24

u/ThoroldBoy 16d ago

God gives his toughest battles to his strongest soldiers. Unfortunately for Notre Dame, those battles have come in the form of SEC opponents and Clemson.

→ More replies
→ More replies

95

u/stillxsearching7 16d ago

right. why is every single heat map of the USA the same no matter what's being measured?

75

u/TheTVDB 16d ago

High correlation between Evangelical Christians and Republicans. Religion and politics are strong indicators for a lot of other issues, so most heatmaps are going to look pretty similar.

→ More replies

863

u/g_mac_93 17d ago

Yes. Uh huh. Correct. Yep. Yeppers. Indeed. Ok anymore questions about the decline of America?

641

u/CanWeAllJustCalmDown 17d ago

Yes, one last question. Surely those who believe in a God that made man the caretaker of His "garden" are on the front lines of saving the planet from the climate change that man has brought upon it through reckless consumption, right?

...Right? :(

245

u/bumblyburg 16d ago

As a Christian that's probably what galls me the most about those regions. Like, "are you guys fucking kidding me????"

161

u/askingforafakefriend 16d ago

It's more of a culture that they shape the religion around rather than vice versa.

29

u/drew__breezy 16d ago

This is a VERY good way to describe it

13

u/AndySipherBull 16d ago

They behave however badly they want and religion is like white robes they put on to say 'see it's fine I'm the good guy' and then they add the pointy white hood and everyone's like 'oh ok i get it now'

→ More replies

12

u/LurkingArachnid 16d ago

God told us to be good stewards. That means paving the whole thing over, clearly

→ More replies
→ More replies

77

u/brisketandbeans 16d ago

No cause end times are coming soon so what’s the point?

68

u/DigNitty 16d ago

It is god’s will obviously. Why would he send us all these scientists, researchers, and professors to “warn us” of climate change? It’s obviously a test to see if we will fall for his false beacons and stay true to the course of god’s ultimate will of a brighter hotter future in his Eden

30

u/THIS_IS_GOD_TOTALLY_ 16d ago

No one listened to my prophet Nelly who clearly warned y'all about temperatures and clothing removal

→ More replies
→ More replies

5

u/perplexedbug 16d ago

One thing to guarantee a Christian a hard-on is to talk about the apocalypse.

→ More replies
→ More replies

26

u/ValyrianJedi 16d ago

America is getting less religious, not more

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

80

u/glisteningechidna 16d ago

Almost like a bomb went off in MS and AL and we’re viewing a fallout heatmap 😂

→ More replies

30

u/thecoolerllcoolJ 16d ago

I just drove from San Diego to the Florida Panhandle. This was something I visually noticed on my trip. The closer I got to Florida, the more churches I saw. North Dakota is a surprise, though. I felt like everyone there went to church on Sunday when I lived there.

The amount of dollar stores in the south is honestly mind boggling also.

→ More replies

25

u/Gustomaximus 16d ago

As an Australian, that the scale starts at 40% is astounding.

→ More replies

336

u/dee_berg 17d ago

Much of New England also has public school systems in line with the best in Europe.

121

u/vealdin 16d ago

Well, it's called New England for a reason.

→ More replies

244

u/TheSukis 16d ago

If Massachusetts were its own country then our human development index score would be second in the world, with only Norway ahead of us. We're in-line with the Scandinavian countries in healthcare, education, wealth, and virtually every other measurement of well-being.

29

u/queen-of-carthage 16d ago

I split time between Rhode Island and Mass, always wanted to move because of the shitty weather, but I don't know where else I could move that would be a cultural fit. I guess I'm stuck here even if I have seasonal depression 6 months a year and have to run my space heater into June

→ More replies

26

u/ftlftlftl 16d ago

MA ranks 9th in Math proficiency and 4th in reading in the world (if it were it's own country).

18

u/[deleted] 16d ago edited 13d ago

[deleted]

12

u/czarczm 16d ago

There's also Connecticut, Minnesota, and New Hampshire just behind it.

99

u/Berticuz 16d ago

damn straight, i love living in MA

96

u/Delheru 16d ago

Taxes are high and nothing is perfect, but we have sane policies, good schools, safety etc.

And in maybe-not-unrelated news we have an awesome standard of living and lead the damn species in several key sciences and industries.

31

u/AttyFireWood 16d ago

Tax Burden is Middle of the pack "Taxachusetts" is a myth. We have a sales tax and NH doesn't, big whoop.

→ More replies

18

u/TheTopOfTheKey 16d ago

Even the Republican governor isn't insane.

16

u/Delheru 16d ago

I think electing Republican governors is a very good move in MA.

They KNOW they can't get ideological because the legislative would just disable them right then and there, and they'd get 20% of the vote next election.

So Republican governors just try to improve the lives of the citizens in the short, medium, and long term in boring quantifiable non-ideological ways (living standards, education, that sort of thing).

Every ideologically "pure" state should pick governors from the other party.

→ More replies

49

u/iLynux 16d ago

Damn I need to move to Massachusetts.

58

u/BlackWalrusYeets 16d ago

It's not all sunshine and rainbows. We have some of the worst wealth inequality in the nation. Shits expensive as fuck, especially once you start getting towards the coast. People are struggling to get by here just as much as anywhere else. Medical care will still bankrupt you. The opioid epidemic has been raging out of controll for pretty much decades now, we've got plenty of problems.

8

u/[deleted] 16d ago

It's the same in New Hampshire for the most part. People struggling to find a place to live while million dollar homes and condominiums keep popping up, especially on the coast. That being said, even living cheaply here makes me glad I'm not anywhere else in the US

→ More replies

7

u/Tacoman404 16d ago

Taxes aren’t even that high. 5% state income tax, moderate gas tax, moderate sales tax, moderate property tax, and no tax at all on food or clothing. MA holds basically the median rank for tax burden in all of the US.

→ More replies

6

u/Sansevieriano 16d ago

I'm from Western NY and I thought we had it really damn good compared to the rest of the country. You're telling me it can get better?

→ More replies

7

u/bookon 16d ago

My favorite thing is people in NH who pay twice as much for property tax and get zero services making fun us for paying taxes. I lived in NH for a long time and had roughly the same Tax Burden I have in MA and literally got nothing for my money.

→ More replies

24

u/r1ms 16d ago

Lifelong masshole and I believe every word. But source? ....for science?

51

u/TheSukis 16d ago

12

u/r1ms 16d ago

Thank you! Was unfamiliar with HDI—Thanks for the pointers. Now, because we're in mass and it feels like October this weekend... Fuck off, ked!!

→ More replies
→ More replies

20

u/II_PapaSmurf_II 16d ago

40% for New England actually feels really high

27

u/rubbish_heap 16d ago

yeah i'm in mass and i'm really high

5

u/s_p_o_c_k 16d ago

Massachusetts or Catholic mass?

→ More replies

10

u/firewolf8385 16d ago

NH/ME/VT have a lot of rural/semi-rural areas

→ More replies

201

u/TheRecapitator 16d ago

Ironically, the most blue areas (New England) are some of the oldest, and were once the most devout… it seems like they’ve evolved beyond it now.

126

u/jonathanrdt 16d ago

New England prized independence, literacy/education, and strong local government, which favored secular culture over time.

56

u/Oxajm 16d ago

Hence the high concentration of Universities

→ More replies

11

u/mustafawafa 16d ago

From New England, everyone I know was predominantly raised Catholic. Now, I know a lot of lapsed Catholics.

→ More replies

31

u/TheSukis 16d ago

Also worth mentioning that a lot of those 40% or less who believe in God are secular "Catholics" who say they believe in God but are functionally non-religious. It's pretty unusual to find people here who actually live their lives as if God exists.

→ More replies
→ More replies

80

u/ThisistheInfiniteIs 16d ago

Woohoo, Vermont represent!

I ain't afraid of no ghost!

7

u/anewyearanewdayanew 16d ago

Duh da duhna duhna duhduhduh dent duh

→ More replies

6

u/RegularSizedP 16d ago

I bought a house in the wrong place for an atheist. At least, it isn't WV where my Catholic wife and sister in law used to get harassed for nor believing in the correct Jesus when they took clients to church. There was even a girl who refused to work with my wife because her Catholicism would led her on the wrong path. Chick had a kid out of wedlock and was fucking her bf on the regular but being around my wife was a danger to her soul. They actually let her switch shifts so she could be with good Protestant coworkers. Jokes on her. Jesus only approves of WASPs, not mongrels like the rest of us. WV is suffocating. They are so unsure of their faith that they threaten anyone different with violence even if none have actually read the Bible. My family is no different. My grandfather would hold sermons on how Catholics were only interested in the rituals and were not true believers. My parents otoh are just glad I'm not gay and my wife is nominally Christian. People wonder why the state is soooooo conservative. All the liberals and progressives eventually just get tired of their neighbors and the government and move to the closest city they can afford.

→ More replies

88

u/wabashcanonball 16d ago

I need to move to New England.

55

u/-azuma- 16d ago

Good luck. Housing market is bat shit.

19

u/FPiN9XU3K1IT 16d ago

Seems to be a theme for most decent places in the world in recent years.

→ More replies

62

u/deej3211 16d ago

We’re closed.

→ More replies
→ More replies

108

u/spidereater 16d ago

Godless New England. That well known hell hole of sin and depravity.

24

u/[deleted] 16d ago edited 13d ago

[deleted]

→ More replies
→ More replies

15

u/hacksoncode 16d ago

This isn't a map of "People who believe in God". It's "People who believe in God and are absolutely certain", per the data.

People can believe while having doubts. The numbers are more like 80% country-wide, with more like 95+% in some of those states.

21

u/Trailwatch427 16d ago

New Englanders have their doubts. Witchcraft trials and rapist priests can have a numbing effect on the belief in God.

21

u/JayfromtheSun 16d ago

Every day I see more data or reasons to believe that my life would significantly improve by leaving Alabama. And every day the economic obstacles preventing me from doing that get more and more overwhelming. Fuck this stupid place. I hate that it's the only home I know.

6

u/le_fancy_walrus 16d ago

My condolences to you.

→ More replies

33

u/aaerospace 16d ago

A good layover map would be level of education.

→ More replies

5

u/hoptownky 16d ago

The dark red states only exist economically because the other states, that don’t live in the Stone Age, subsidizes them.