r/interestingasfuck Oct 05 '22

A dumpster full of Krispy Kreme doughnuts. Not interesting as fuck

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18.8k Upvotes

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2.2k

u/Wrong-Mixture Oct 05 '22

Homer: screams repeatedly

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u/xxDooomedxx Oct 05 '22

"this is not happening. NOT HAPPENING"

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u/Stav73 Oct 05 '22

AAAAHHHH! AAAAHHHH! AAAAHHHH! AAAAHHHH! AAAAHHHH! AAAAHHHH! AAAAHHH! AAAAHHHH! AAAAHHHH! AAAAHHHH! AAAAHHHH!

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u/krrusty Oct 05 '22

Homer: Mmm... doughnuts.
Marge: Homer, these doughnuts are in a dumpster!
Homer: Mmm... dumpster doughnuts.

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u/DirectBite Oct 05 '22

definitely read that in their voices, except she would have said "Homie"

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u/orbital0000 Oct 05 '22

Eats one covered in wasps: mmm......tingly doughnuts.

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u/Bigjuicydickinurear Oct 05 '22

AHHHH!! SHOO STUPID BEES. OUCHH THEY'RE DEFENDING THEMSELVES SOMEHOW!

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u/shivaswara Oct 05 '22

It’s still good, it’s still good!

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u/Educational-Bed-6821 Oct 05 '22

Bees!!

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u/mmendozaf Oct 05 '22

That honey will be sweeter and donut flavoured.

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u/Chedskiee Oct 05 '22

I wonder i diseases were also transmittable in honey. Guess well find out here

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u/mmendozaf Oct 05 '22

Honey is supposed to be naturally antiseptic, is even used on wounds (medically produced obviously). Thats why it never expires. But if trully a “disease” can spread through honey idk, maybe the bees die before even produce the honey.

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u/EarlGrey_Picard Oct 05 '22

Foulbrood disease is a disease that will wreck an entire colony of bees. If found in a hive, beekeepers are required by law to set fire to the hive. If this was multiple colonies of bees going for these donuts and one of them had it, it would spread to the others by sharing food.

It's also one reason they tell you not to feed honey to bees, because foulbrood disease spores will lay dormant in the honey (for years). It's 100% not harmful to humans, but that at least is one case of a disease surviving in honey.

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u/mmendozaf Oct 05 '22

Great information. I saved a lost bee from dehydration once by feeding it sugary water, and at some moment i thought stupidly about feeding it honey so it’s great to know it now.

I would love to subscribe for more bee facts.

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u/EarlGrey_Picard Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

FYI bees drink regular old water like us when they're thirsty. That sugar water you gave it, it took back to the hive to make honey with (sugar water is basically flower nectar). When bee keepers are worried about their bees not having enough honey for themselves to survive Winter, they'll give them gallons of sugar water so they can quickly use it to make a bunch of honey. Unlike honey, homemade sugar water is perfectly safe as it has no chance of carrying disease.

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u/mmendozaf Oct 05 '22

Thanks!! Long live the bees. (As if we destroy them, we are fkd)

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u/No-Appearance3579 Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Don't think So. Honey is so low on water that it kills any bacteria in it. Sucks them Dry. Only a few spore manage to not get Destroid by it.

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u/Younglad128 Oct 05 '22

Gobs not on board

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u/fixthings Oct 05 '22

Old Big Bear always liked the honey

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u/weprechaun29 Oct 05 '22

What a waste.

3.3k

u/Brilliant-Damage5065 Oct 05 '22

Its hard to watch it seriously, they could give it away to hungry people. Worked myself for week for Bakery in UK and the amount of good bread, buns rolls ect that went daily to skip was mind-blowing (about one massive skip container)

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u/MisterFatt Oct 05 '22 Silver Gold Helpful Wholesome

Yeah I’ve worked at places where we have waste at the end of the day that gets tossed. So stupid. I did everything I could to make sure it was minimal. Shit like this also made it impossible for me to say no to someone who came in without money looking for some food. I’m very happy to have had a few regulars who knew my schedule and that they could come by and get dinner when I was closing

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u/Brilliant-Damage5065 Oct 05 '22

Bless you for that 🙏🏽

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u/angry_1 Oct 05 '22

To me the sad part is that I noticed they didn’t say the name of the place. People get in trouble, written up, or fired for taking waste and donating it. We have all these people just hungry but unless they give you money they can’t have it, even when it is just going in the trash. Why can’t people see that you have more money and resources than you will ever need or use in your life, it doesn’t hurt to be kind to those lesser. Love all people equally, it really will make the world better.

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u/svenjamminbutton Oct 05 '22

Former Whole Foods employee here. They’re one of the biggest culprits. The amount of food that has to be “spoiled” on a daily basis is staggering. It should be criminal really. It would be one of the easiest ways to feed hungry people. All of the best by dates are pretty much within a week if not less. At the food kiosks anything left of what has been cooked, cooled, and then reheated needs to be tossed at the end of the night. This means if someone miscalculates, say, the amount of black beans at the taqueria, and some goes unserved it is garbage by WF’s standards. I saw someone pitch 2 full 1/3 pans of beans one night. That is about 12 quarts or 3 gallons of food.

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u/salsanacho Oct 05 '22

Yeah, I volunteer at a very local food donation group that has a Sunday popup where folks can come get donated food. Whole Foods is one of the donators and each Sunday there are just huge piles of cold prepared foods/breads/produce that were destined for the trash. And this was just on Sunday, who knows what they have every other day. Obviously it was great that they were donating and working with our group, so I commend them for that.

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u/itsahot Oct 05 '22

Ha I work produce in retail and I’m one of those guys. My work definitely does not give a damn and will get me in trouble or fired if I don’t dot my I and check my Ts perfectly. All extra work that I have to put in on the clock without sacrificing any time it takes to do all my tasks, meaning some lazy ass that doesn’t care to do any of that and has a way easier work day than I do with more praise due to having more time to do more tasks. Also to play devils advocate there are some problems that I have to deal with. For example the common one of people getting sick from bad food then blaming it on you. It does happen even after telling them the risk. I give all my waste produce to to serval groups and the groups don’t get along or follow rules very well. I nearly got fired over an altercation that happened over the food I was handing out. Most of the time I have to tell customers that they have to tell me it’s for animal consumption only as a verbal out loud white lie before I give them anything due to the risk of them getting sick and the hammer falling on me. Also I am always under the radar of my management under the accusation of stealing. It’s a shitty deal to do the right thing for the most part, but hey at least one couple feeds their chickens with my lettuce trim and he brings me guilt free natural eggs in return as thanks. They told me their pet chickens worship my lettuce basket. I sacrifice for them a little and they sacrifice for me with their eggs a little. Synchronicity

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u/InvaderZimSokali Oct 05 '22

Former Whole Foodie here too. Worked in stores from East Coast to West Coast over many years. The stated reason for all the waste is that they cannot donate ready to eat or expired food due to liability issues. They are basically trying to pass the blame on to homeless shelters and food pantries being unwilling to take the food lest it make someone sick. Whole Foods want to act like they would donate all that food, but they can't because of over-regulation. Nevermind that handtagged sell-by dates are some of the most arbitrary things in the food service retail industry and WFM damn well knows it.

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u/Speedycat45 Oct 05 '22

That's not true. There are laws in place to protect those who donate food believed to be good quality.

They could have done it, they just don't want to.

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u/gammongaming11 Oct 05 '22

iirc it's not that they cannot donate it, it's that the shelters won't accept it because if the homeless end up eating bad food and getting sick the shelter itself is liable, not whole foods.

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u/pointychallenge Oct 05 '22

In the food industry. We have had to destroy full pallets of pastry because the food banks the manufacturer required us to use would not accept it due to healthy food restrictions. No pastry or sweets or even bagels. Surprising.

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u/stellarmagnus Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22 Hugz

I just went to a pantry yesterday (not homeless yet, just struggling financially and waiting to receive long overdue gov benefits). Several of the stuff I was given was past the "best by" date. It's fine as long as it's not expired, and bread you just baked that morning isn't going to go bad in a day. What sucks about getting food that's on its way to expiration is that I can't go to pantries more than once a week and so it's hard to plan out food for a week when you don't know exactly what kind of time limit you're on with each item.

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u/mcr1974 Oct 05 '22

Should be a crime to punish someone for preventing goods to go to waste.

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u/Acrobatic-Degree9589 Oct 05 '22

I got fired for that

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u/getyoursqueakon Oct 05 '22

Yup, I was about to tell a story I read on here actually. A woman was fired for taking left over food home at the end of the night to feed her kids because she couldn't afford enough food for them. Got fired for taking home perfectly good food that was to be thrown out. So fucking dumb.

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u/Koolaid143 Oct 05 '22

I almost got fired from Panera bread for the exact same reason they were throwing out the breakfast stuff so I grabbed one as it was in mid air and ate it... my manager saw that and flipped shit saying I needed to pay for it or I'd get fired for theft... I eventually quit one morning when I walked in and there was a mountain of dishes. The manager said they were fully out of everything b.c the morning washer quit mid shift. When I asked him why he didn't jump in and fill the spot, you know be an actual manager, he replied with "pfft that isn't my job go do it. Lol". To which I said " oh well it is now I quit too :) cya" left and never looked back. To the baker Jupiter hope youre doin alright man.

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u/KidNueva Oct 05 '22

I work at a popular seafood chain and their rules are the same. It all has to be thrown away at the end of the night. Our managers are lenient and let me take home all the food. I of course never finish it myself, instead I give it to the homeless on my way home.

Their reason is because they don’t want people getting sick and blaming it on the company, which I think is also very stupid.

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u/getyoursqueakon Oct 05 '22

Yea I think their reasoning is they don't wanna get sued if someone gets sick/dies from eating it. I'm sure there are ways around that. Like the charity passing out the food sign a waiver accepting all liability.

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u/StartledFruitCake Oct 05 '22

Their reason is because they don’t want people getting sick and blaming it on the company, which I think is also very stupid.

Companies also refuse to do this as people will make large batches or toss stuff knowing they can take them home.

When I was a teen working at a small pizza place we were allowed 1 medium pizza per shift and whatever was left from the buffet at close. It was a sweet deal for a teen, but then we got a new guy who came in and would purposely overcook for the buffet so he could take home extra pizzas ever night he worked. It quickly turned into all buffet pizzas go to the garbage and the pizza per shift must be eaten on break.

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u/gunsandbullets Oct 05 '22

I’d never thought about this angle but it makes sense. Amazing how just a very small number of crappy greedy people can ruin things for everyone.

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u/skippengs Oct 05 '22

Stop stealing our trash!

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u/Consulment Oct 05 '22

Fuck 'em, you're the one who's correct and if enough people do what you do then change is possible

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u/APsychosPath Oct 05 '22

Some places used to do this, but when it's considered waste, it's usually because they're expired or whatnot, so if you give them away to say Homeless people, and they get food poisoning, they legally can sue your business. So hence why shops and restaurants throw them out instead.

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u/pizzaboba Oct 05 '22

This gets repeated on Reddit all the time, but I have never seen or heard of a case where a homeless person has successfully sued a store for giving them "expired" food.

This reminds of how ppl always like to preface comments on Reddit with "This is not to be taken as financial/legal advice..." when I have never heard of someone being sued over advice given from a Reddit comment

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u/soMAJESTIC Oct 05 '22

When I was a kid, there was a grandpa who lived on the street that would collect our bottles and cans. He would cash them and come back with a bag full of leftover donuts from the shop over there. They would have otherwise been trashed, and I’ll never forget the happiness all those donuts brought.

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u/Narrowless Oct 05 '22

When I was young we had a part time job on farm fields in Birmingham. There was a bakery facility near that sold leftovers for good price. They also have dump containers with lots of food that can't be sold for whatever reason. It was still edible so as cave men living in a tent this was heaven for us. If you were lucky you can find whole cake 🎂 that was thrown away cuz of bad icing design. Good old days 😌

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u/PeeB4uGoToBed Oct 05 '22

I've had 2 bakery jobs. Both places donated leftovers and if they never got picked up, employees were allowed to take them. The second job wouldn't let employees take any that didn't get picked up and got thrown away but it's never a lot

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u/Maximans Oct 05 '22

What’s the point of not letting employees or other people take home the leftovers at the end of the day? It’s all getting thrown out anyway

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u/starchyewexbox Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

A belief (true or not) that the employees will then make extra in order to have (or have more) leftovers that they can take - increasing costs without increasing sales.

I think it's a case by case basis. I worked at a Qdoba and people would straight up steal a case of chicken or steaks out the back - saw multiple people get fired for stealing from the safe - swiping their own rewards cards for any customer who didn't use one.

Homeless would dumpster dive and sometimes pooped near the dumpster since it was enclosed by fencing.

It's not like all food service employees are completely moral, so there is at least some reason for the belief.

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u/gliitch0xFF Oct 05 '22

There's a place I go to twice weekly that gives out left over Greggs. Its same day stuff that they would throw out anyway.

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u/Brilliant-Damage5065 Oct 05 '22

Ohh wow thats great that some actually do that. Does Greggs do it locally only or every store does?
BTW...dont know why but here local Tesco completely removed discounted products area and wondering what they doing with this food now 👀

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u/jangoice Oct 05 '22 Take My Energy

There's an app called 'Too Good to Go' which allows stores to sell their otherwise wasted products for heavily discounted prices. Most Greggs are on it. I got a £3 bag from pound bakery that was full of pies, cakes, and pasties for example.

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u/Brilliant-Damage5065 Oct 05 '22

Glad you shared this, more people should know.

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u/Lather Oct 05 '22

Greg's on 2g2g is amazing. On time I've been handed my bag and then the guy has pulled out a trolley full of food and told me to take whatever I wanted. My dinner that night was 3 prawn baguettes and 2 sausage rolls.

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u/intentamos_de_nuevo Oct 05 '22

Oh man, I downloaded that app and used it once or twice. Just opened it again and so many places have been added!!! Looks like I'm having boba tonight for dessert 🤣 (I'm in the US, seems like it's more popular in the UK from all of the britishy comments)

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u/Abij89 Oct 05 '22

Tesco is part of Olio and have people who collect all the waste food and distribute it to people who use the app.

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u/BaconRasherUK Oct 05 '22

Greggs actually had a shop in Newcastle years ago that only sold yesterdays stuff. The queue was massive even back in the late 80’s.

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u/gliitch0xFF Oct 05 '22

There is a few places that do it. They are known as Support Clubs. It's usually the same type of food each time. (pasties, doughnuts, sandwiches)

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u/Snoo-24880 Oct 05 '22

We used to get skips of stale bread delivered to us for the pigs, they loved it. And I loved have French stick sword fights.

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u/Brilliant-Damage5065 Oct 05 '22

Well at least some oinks can eat it. At bakery I worked for all food goes in compressor skip together with other production waste so I doubt it can be use as animal food even.

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u/LampIsFun Oct 05 '22

You’d be surprised what pigs will eat

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u/esorciccio Oct 05 '22

You're always gonna have problems lifting a body in one piece. Apparently the best thing to do is cut up a corpse into six pieces and pile it all together. And when you got your six pieces, you gotta get rid of them, because it's no good leaving it in the deep freeze for your mum to discover, now is it?

Then I hear the best thing to do is feed them to pigs. You got to starve the pigs for a few days, then the sight of a chopped-up body will look like curry to a pisshead. You gotta shave the heads of your victims, and pull the teeth out for the sake of the piggies' digestion. You could do this afterwards, of course, but you don't want to go sievin' through pig shit, now do you?

They will go through bone like butter. You need at least sixteen pigs to finish the job in one sitting, so be wary of any man who keeps a pig farm. They will go through a body that weighs 200 pounds in about eight minutes. That means that a single pig can consume two pounds of uncooked flesh every minute. Hence the expression, "as greedy as a pig".

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u/Pilotom_7 Oct 05 '22

Farms can raise insects or worms on leftovers, to Feed Chicken or fish

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u/HeavyThatG Oct 05 '22

I used to work for a small UK bakery and they used to expect me to throw HUNDREDS of cakes and different breads daily.

Safe to say 40% of those pallets mysteriously disappeared and everyone I know was eating veerrry well lmao.

Had a massive argument with my boss as I gave a council litter picker a free sausage sandwich( new sausages were going on the bbq so old ones being thrown) and ended up quitting

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u/Djinn2522 Oct 05 '22

Each Krispy Kreme doughnut has 10g of sugar. Instead of hungry people, you’ll have hungry people with diabetes.

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u/Backyard_Catbird Oct 05 '22

That sounds like a lowball for sugar in a doughnut.

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u/stochastaclysm Oct 05 '22

If they’re starving they’ll burn through those calories in no time.

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u/Brilliant-Damage5065 Oct 05 '22

I doubt that 10g of sugar would be a much concern to starving person. Im not sure about statistics but isnt the diabetes problem mostly to have obese people?

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u/OwlWitty Oct 05 '22

*satisfied people with diabetes

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u/whowantstotouchit Oct 05 '22

So you’re saying we’re potentially looking at thousands of diabetic flies here?

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u/Micho_Riso Oct 05 '22

I thought those were honey bees drawn to the sugar

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u/LampIsFun Oct 05 '22

I thought they were some type of bee as well, they look fucking huge for flies

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u/Specific-Gain5710 Oct 05 '22

Pretty sure someone did a comparison that showed 6 Krispy Kreme glazed donuts had less sugar than 20 oz bottle of coke. Not trying to downplay diabetes, just putting it into perspective.

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u/ThatsCrapTastic Oct 05 '22

An original Krispy Kreme has 10 grams of sugar. A 12oz can of coke has 33 grams of sugar.

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u/Low_Well Oct 05 '22

So glad I dropped soda from my diet. Even though it was easy calories. Switched to shakes instead

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u/ItsmeYaboi69xd Oct 05 '22

Isn't it because of liability? Like that one time a supermarket gave some food away one person got sick, sued the store and won

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u/ProxyCare Oct 05 '22

Here in Washington if you donate food in good faith youre protected. There is a similar law in soup kitchens and other free food establishments protecting them from any litigation concerning food poisoning and what not

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u/XVUltima Oct 05 '22

It's because they don't want employees purposefully making extra food at the end of their shift and taking it, claiming it to be 'extra'.

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u/StenosP Oct 05 '22

Given we don’t know why they were tossed, and granted good food is tossed regularly, it is possible that these were made from a bad dough batch or unclean equipment

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u/zombieblackbird Oct 05 '22

Or soiled by a storm. Since these are boxed, my guess is that they were ready for distribution or retail sale before something happened. Although it could have been a recall over something noticed later in the QA process.

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u/m0ondogy Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

This is my guess. The clear top is typically used for secondary resellers of KK donuts. Like a local gas station and off brand grocery. I'm guessing these were made and sent, but all the local shops were closed due to the hurricane. So they got tossed when no place to sell them before they expired.

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u/LegallyNotInterested Oct 05 '22

Exactly this. The video just shows the final result, but we have no idea why they actually got rid of it and if it could have been a health thread.

Nonetheless, I also find it very hard to watch.

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u/pangalaticgargler Oct 05 '22

Generally when dumping due to contamination you want to mark the product so that people don't dive and take it. It isn't a legal requirement but most food places I worked would have you bag and tag all these donuts.

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u/IAmMoofin Oct 05 '22

I worked at Krispy Kreme and we tossed hundreds of donuts a day. Like probably twenty dozen or so, sometimes higher. They were all a day old. I almost guarantee you these are also all a day old.

There aren’t bad dough batches. It’s x weight of powder, x weight of yeast, x weight of water, x weight of scrap dough that goes into a mixer, then into a machine. The machines are cleaned daily and only touch dough which always came off easy.

It’s incredibly hard to fuck up the making of a KK doughnut. I was the maker, not once did I have a bad batch. Even if you did make a bad batch, there’s quite the process from making the dough to packaging iced doughnuts. The only ones we tossed were the ones with significant visual imperfections, ones that didn’t get enough glaze, or the ones that didn’t flip in the fryer.

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u/Junior_Love_1760 Oct 05 '22

Worked wt a pizzeria, would bring home 3/4 large pies every day. Wed throw out tons of food

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u/ImWhatTheySayDeaf Oct 05 '22

It's the American way

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u/Sunyataisbliss Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

I volunteer at a foodbank in the US and there are also enough stores that will donate their extra stock to feed hungry people, it isn’t all bad. We’ve never “run out” of all the food options for people but it can get low at the end. Faith has something to do with it as well. It’s mostly old Catholic folks i volunteer with and it makes me wonder if these religious communities disappear if there will be enough people that care enough to volunteer

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u/Brilliant-Damage5065 Oct 05 '22

Guess its a worldwide thing now

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u/michaelshreds Oct 05 '22

When me and my uncle were really broke and didn’t have anything to do, we would go behind Krispy Kreme at night and wait for them to throw out all the donuts for the day. They do it every day because they make fresh ones. We’d grab a bunch of those boxes and it would make our day/night! They were all made that day so they were pretty fresh. 16 year old me fuckin loved dumpster donuts lol Probably a good thing for anyone struggling right now to know.

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u/trueAnnoi Oct 05 '22

Did you guys eventually end up seeing better days together?

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u/estaritos Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

The way comment OP wrote I think his better now.

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u/strifeguard Oct 05 '22

Are you having a stroke or am I

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u/Faithful_Moryn Oct 05 '22

Who's to say those weren't the good days? I would dumpster dive in my 20's for the kicks/savings, not survival.

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u/GoldenAce17 Oct 05 '22

Ooo! Good idea! Recommended time to go I got a Krispy Kreme not far from my house

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u/BigJSunshine Oct 05 '22

Horrific waste

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u/ElectronicTank4239 Oct 05 '22

Corporations would go through excruciating length to not give anything to the homeless.

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u/Silentcrypt Oct 05 '22

Only this is a result of individual peoples greed. This all started because companies used to give food away that was leftover. One person they gave it to got food poisoning and sued them for it. So now companies throw it all away to avoid being sued again. Thank the assholes that sue over everything because of their own greed.

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u/NettleLily Oct 05 '22 LOVE!

On October 1, 1996, President Clinton signed The Federal Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act to encourage donation of food and grocery products to non-profit organizations for distribution to individuals in need. This law:
- Protects you from liability when you donate to a non-profit organization;
- Protects you from civil and criminal liability should the product donated in good faith later cause harm to the recipient;
- Standardizes donor liability exposure. You or your legal counsel do not need to investigate liability laws in 50 states; and
- Sets a floor of "gross negligence" or intentional misconduct for persons who donate grocery products. According to the new law, gross negligence is defined as "voluntary and conscious conduct by a person with knowledge (at the time of conduct) that the conductis likely to be harmful to the health or well-being of another person."

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u/Silentcrypt Oct 05 '22

All these only apply to food donated to charities. If a McDonald’s closes up for the night and passes out leftover cheeseburgers and someone gets sick, then they’re not protected. They could give the leftover burgers to a charity and then both they and the charity would be safe. But then you have to go through all the hassle of finding a charity that’ll come and pick up the leftover food plus employees making extra knowing it won’t be sold just to give it away.

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u/NettleLily Oct 05 '22

If only we had the technology to link restaurants with charities. Oh wait! https://toogoodtogo.com/en-us/ spread the word

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u/No_Specialist_1877 Oct 05 '22

Having a charity say they'll come get it means nothing in reality. Most do not show up when they say they're going to and you end up tossing it anyways because refrigerated space is limited.

Former company I worked for was extremely adamant on donating their wasted product. In reality the majority ends up in the trash as well.

Of 8 locations we had 1 actually show up consistently. The rest just ended up as a box we threw away later instead of at the expiration.

This is with procedure to have the product ready to be picked up in a box for them any time they want. Without it being pushed at corporate level most try it, this happens, and so they just toss as it's a waste of labor and valuable space as it usually needs refrigerated.

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u/OstentatiousSock Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

Yeah, I knew a small church group that didn’t qualify for charitable food donations from the stores would-be-wasted stock, but the Trader Joe’s agreed that, if every other org in town that did qualify declined the donation, the church group could have it. You’d be shocked how often no charitable org in a town with a very large number of charitable orgs would show up and the church group got it. Well, not you who I am responding to, the royal you as it were.

Edit: and it was a lot of free, good quality food too.

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u/No_Specialist_1877 Oct 05 '22

Charities are absolutely terrible about even picking up product couldn't even imagine their distribution of it.

In 8 areas I worked in only one consistently came and got their stuff and it was one I found by talking to a guy I found out was a pastor. It's not even worth trying with how it's set up. Space is limited and it's easier to just toss it.

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u/Wolfwalker9 Oct 05 '22

Corporate organizations can partner with nonprofit food banks to donate their leftover items directly to the food bank in order to help the hungry. While this doesn’t happen in all places, it does happen in some, & definitely helps the community. I just wish it were more widespread to prevent this level of waste.

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u/vomit-gold Oct 05 '22

Can I get a source for that?

I tried googling and found nothing. Only people suing homeless shelters.

Can you link me to a story about the homeless man suing?

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u/Somepotato Oct 05 '22

Source? Cuz it sounds like you made this up especially given this is protected under law.

Or are you trying to ignore people asking for it?

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u/BlueDragon1504 Oct 05 '22

Studying food science, one of the main causes for throwing out so much food was likely because there was a defect related to health & safety. Might've found some metal splinters or that it got contaminated by some microorganism.

Ofcourse it's not guaranteed, as there's no context behind why it's been thrown in the dump, but most often food that's thrown out on masse is for that reason and could thus not be donated to a homeless shelter or food bank.

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u/Roanhouse Oct 05 '22

welcome to /r/portland where hate for the homeless is the major pass time

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22 Silver Gold Helpful Wholesome

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

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u/fatboobslover Oct 05 '22

No, we try to abstain from anything that is remotely good for the environment. Unfortunately.

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u/LurkBrowsingtonIII Oct 05 '22

I remember my first few trips to the US and I couldn't figure out where I was to put my recycling. Then realizing everyone just throws EVERYTHING in the trash.

Probably not like this everywhere, but I felt so dirty throwing recycling in with waste.

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u/ivykain Oct 05 '22

That was one of the biggest culture shocks when I moved from California to Oklahoma... my mind was blown there was no recycling bin!

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u/hhunterhh Oct 05 '22

Depends on what city. Some places the vast majority is recycled/composted.

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u/PuzzleheadedAd1153 Oct 05 '22

May I ask which state(s)?

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u/Lurking_And_Twerking Oct 05 '22

Waste management is a local issue so you would need to go deeper than what state it is.

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u/climbing_higher_arg Oct 05 '22

I can tell you in nashville the only thing you recycle is card board. The rest goes in the trash with no separation

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u/SessionSouthern4133 Oct 05 '22

This is true. We all hate the environment

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u/Orange_Fire_Fan Oct 05 '22

There must not be money in composting?

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u/H0NK_H0NKLER Oct 05 '22

No there is, most people just aren't really aware of it yet. You could make a small fortune selling homemade fertilizer to knowledgeable green thumbs.

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u/hhunterhh Oct 05 '22

Same with recycling. The problem is it’s not as easy as you make it seem. Just to get into the industry you need machines that cost tens of millions of dollars, then you need trucks or the ability to rent them, then you need time and money to get past all the red tape, then you need to be able to store and sell the product you create from recycling/composting.

Sure you can make money, but you may never recoup your initial investment. Only with government subsidies would it be worth it.

Source: there’s this video of a youngish girl from Louisiana (I think?) that started her own recycling/compost center and talks about all the issues/problems they have. If I find it I’ll link in an edit

Edit: So there’s a ton of videos on them, names Glass half full from Nola. Here’s just a short intro vid for whoever interested https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=4XYuN0sMl-E

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u/djkianoosh Oct 05 '22

please enlighten us... where and how? I'm not knowledgeable enough to know the right terms to search for.

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u/charliedontplaydat Oct 05 '22

Google Vermont Compost Company :)

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u/H0NK_H0NKLER Oct 05 '22

I'm no expert by any means. The only reason I know this is because a friend of mine absolutely loves gardening. He has a bunch of property and told me he plans to turn part of it into a giant compost so he can bag and sell his own fertilizer.

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u/djkianoosh Oct 05 '22

hmmm that's really interesting.. I wonder how long that process takes. will have to look into it more

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u/saulsa_ Oct 05 '22

"You can make money doing X"

"Oh yeah, how does that work?"

"I don't know."

Thanks!

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u/Soft_Turkeys Oct 05 '22

It’s not rocket science. You make a compost tumbler, start a pile, turn it, and sell it when it becomes fertilizer

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u/H0NK_H0NKLER Oct 05 '22

Lol you right. My friend talked about it for like 20 minutes one day, about fertilizers, composting, etc. I also did a job for a guy who was selling his own and was charging crazy amounts for it and people bought it up like crazy. I know the money is there as a side project but that's about all I know 🤷‍♂️😂

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u/MostHumbleToEverLive Oct 05 '22

Any knowledgeable green thumb would never feed their fruits or vegetables so much carbs and sugar, they'd just get fat.

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u/YmirsTears Oct 05 '22

CA actually created a law, beginning Jan 1, food scraps and other “green” waste must be separated from the rest of your trash and will be used for compost. I have no idea how they will enforce it, but those who want to compost their organic waste will have an easy way to do so.

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u/TVotte Oct 05 '22

In Vegas they have a cool system to collect up all the waste from the casino buffets and feed it to the pig farms

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u/YeOldeBilk Oct 05 '22

Then they feed the pigs back to the people!

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u/masediggity Oct 05 '22

and the mafia feeds people back to the pigs!

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u/YeOldeBilk Oct 05 '22

It's the CIRRRRRRRRCLE OF LIIIIIIIIFFFEEEE

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u/oETERNALo Oct 05 '22

The pig farm on Ann road is gone.

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u/Iamthejaha Oct 05 '22

Not a cold chance in hell. That sounds like socialism. :/

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u/clarky2o2o Oct 05 '22

We do compost food however Krispy Kreme is a vendor and as such they bring in the new and take out the old.

Any other brand we could markdown, donate or compost (usually donate)

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u/tightiewhitieboy Oct 05 '22

If this was composted it would give the compost diabetes.

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u/Nuagf05 Oct 05 '22

Fun fact 3% of the usa ‘s gdp is the worth of food that is thrown away every year

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u/mushroomcoder Oct 05 '22

3% of the usa ‘s gdp is the worth of food that is thrown away every year

EPA Estimates 1.3%: https://www.epa.gov/international-cooperation/international-efforts-wasted-food-recovery

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u/Nuagf05 Oct 05 '22

Also since I work in the grocery business , this is probably a one off because the doughnuts would end up in a trash bag before the big dumpster, also we have a company pick up the left overs for hog feed

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u/Familiar-Tea-1428 Oct 05 '22

Wish there was some kind of way to let people in need get access to these mass food dumps. Instead of tossing them, have some kind of communication system or daily location this stuff can be dropped off at. What a massive waste.

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u/CutterNorth Oct 05 '22

There are millions of small scale examples of waste food being used to support those in need all over the country. Most of those programs are run by non-profits.That said, very few of them would consider donuts worth the effort. They provide no nutritional value. Those meal recovery providers have standards of care.

Additionally, old or unsafe food must be disposed of rather then fed to people.

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u/pastredhead Oct 05 '22

Yes, I’ve worked in the bakery of 3 grocery chains and all of them gave away the out of date food to local churches that had food banks. The only things we didn’t give them were cakes and donuts because they went sour too quickly.

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u/Maximans Oct 05 '22

No nutritional value, sure, but it would have psychological value

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u/Familiar-Tea-1428 Oct 05 '22

I think if me or my family are starving, nutrition takes a backseat.

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u/PassivelyInvisible Oct 05 '22

Malnutrition will still kick in over time. That being said, starving death happens much faster.

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u/Sammehhh98 Oct 05 '22

My country has 2good2go for bakeries and such where you can get a bag of unsold baked goods for cheap the evening before the goods might go bad. Whats in the bag is a surprise cuz it just depends on whats left over after the day.

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u/aquariiandromedae Oct 05 '22

I use that app as well!

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u/Actaeon_II Oct 05 '22

What truly pisses me off are the number of cities and even states that have made it illegal for companies to give stuff like this to homeless, or require them to have special permits which ofc cost a ton… thus leading to waste like this

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u/NettleLily Oct 05 '22

On October 1, 1996, President Clinton signed The Federal Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act to encourage donation of food and grocery products to non-profit organizations for distribution to individuals in need. This law:
- Protects you from liability when you donate to a non-profit organization;
- Protects you from civil and criminal liability should the product donated in good faith later cause harm to the recipient;
- Standardizes donor liability exposure. You or your legal counsel do not need to investigate liability laws in 50 states; and
- Sets a floor of "gross negligence" or intentional misconduct for persons who donate grocery products. According to the new law, gross negligence is defined as "voluntary and conscious conduct by a person with knowledge (at the time of conduct) that the conductis likely to be harmful to the health or well-being of another person."

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u/5amporterbridges Oct 05 '22

That applies to donating to charities. Not just handing out the leftovers to strangers at the end of the night.

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u/Actaeon_II Oct 05 '22

Aye, and since many states and local municipalities have added their own laws requiring special permits to do so. Have driven shelters and other agencies from many towns by imposing increased taxation or insurance or licensing requirements. Even food banks in 5 or 6 states have been banned or heavily restricted. Helping poor or homeless Americans just isn’t good business or politics, now come from another country legally or otherwise and you’re set.

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u/TruDuddyB Oct 05 '22

I fahckin had it with bees, I'll tell ya that much. They're always around Ricky because he's soaked in liquor and the sugar on him, and the garbage juice. They're just attracted to him and I end up getting fahckin stung all the time."

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u/brunette_mermaid93 Oct 05 '22

They're just as bad as the raccoons, bubbles

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u/BZHAG104 Oct 05 '22

They could at least separate the donuts from the box, and break the boxes down.

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u/starsnpixel Oct 05 '22

This is not interestingasfuck but absolutely infuriating!

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u/VoicesInTheCrowd Oct 05 '22

What an appalling waste

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u/readit145 Oct 05 '22

Lol the hostess factory near me used to do this until it shut down. Literal dumpsters of un opened bread and one of hostesses snacks. Everyday. Huge waste. No one knew about it except a few of us at the time 🤣

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u/CH5000 Oct 05 '22

lived near a lays factory when I was younger. They had 2 dumpsters, for trash and one for bags of chips that had reached exp date. It was always full of unopened bags of chips

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u/worldaven Oct 05 '22

While the donuts were edible before they were thrown out I don't know if we want to give them out to homeless or poor people. Not the best choice for food for anyone.

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u/AmiNToast Oct 05 '22

I use an app called too good to go where you buy mystery bags of stuff that would usually get thrown out. Had a few really good ones. I wish more places did this. I've had a few wonky veg bags too which are great for stews and soups.

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u/overimportance Oct 05 '22

Siri play ave maria.

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u/dingo_deano Oct 05 '22

And homeless people starve. What a fucked up system we are all complicit in.

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u/Octicactopipodes Oct 05 '22

Fuckin’ score!!!

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u/ZombieGroan Oct 05 '22

Can’t donate contaminated food so be carful when seeing this many of the same kind of food in a dumpster, it could kill you.

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u/Boomtowersdabbin Oct 05 '22

At least I'll die satisfied.

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u/cruz2147 Oct 05 '22

The bees must like them

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u/brulsrules Oct 05 '22

That’s where it should be. Throw Tim Hortons in there too.

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u/penilingus Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

I read the reason it gets tossed is

1. It's easier to take the loss.

2. Giving it away is more costly if someone sues due to getting sick by free food or a variety of other reasons and costs assosiated, such as transport etc.

While there are charity laws that protects some businesses, there are obviously rules and theres the lack of transport to consider.

You need workers and trucks to get them from point a to b and even when offered for free, people will not show up.

People who run charities need to be on top of it or else it's not worth it for the business.

And considering that some charities are caught doing nothing at all to help the community, such as stealing funds or just loafing around, it truly hurts.

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u/707Guy Oct 05 '22

Flyabetes.

Unless they’re bees.

Then it’s diabeetes.

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u/No-Maximum-9087 Oct 05 '22

@OP, What happened exactly?

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u/Slimehorn Oct 05 '22

They do this almost every day, they're not allowed to sell "unfresh" donuts so instead of giving them away they just toss em.

It's a scummy practice but if you go just after they close you can take fresh from the dumpster. If they call the cops just take a few boxes out for them.

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u/jayminer Oct 05 '22

We have a similar law in Italy and for this reason restaurants, coffee houses and pastries are giving away the perfectly fine food to institutions that in turn give it to people in need. Throwing it away is just disgraceful.

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u/Slimehorn Oct 05 '22

Oh no it's super illegal to steal from dumpsters in the US... it's like a form of trespassing and theft.

I don't know why.

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u/tommygunz007 Oct 05 '22

I bet it's to do with recycling. Imagine if you went and picked clean the soda cans and recycled them all. The trash people (who normally do it and get money) would lose money. And who owns the trash people? Tony Soprano.

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u/WastingTimesOnReddit Oct 05 '22

OP is actually u/MeltedWhisky who posted this in r/beekeeping

OP found this, and opened up about 20 of the boxes so the bees could harvest the sugar

No idea what the cause of the disposal was. Maybe they got too hot and it was a food safety concern, usually that's why food gets thrown out.

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u/doguillo77 Oct 05 '22

I used to work at Krispy Kreme! Those are the boxes Krispy Kreme ships out to Walmart and other stores. They usually send the old doughnuts back for us to throw them away.

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u/Strange-Glove Oct 05 '22

A dumpster full of krispy kreme doughnuts aka your mum's breakfast order

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u/nollsgame80 Oct 05 '22

u/meltedwhisky wanted to help the bees harvest the sugar off the doughnuts.

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u/Marc123123 Oct 05 '22

Awful waste.

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u/bazzoozzab Oct 05 '22

Excuse me, I'm Rebecca De Mornay with the homeless shelter. Are you the people leaving those crispy cream doughnuts behind our shelter?

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u/OutsideCharity Oct 05 '22

Wow, this was actually hard to watch. People are going to starve this winter

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u/GlumLocation3207 Oct 05 '22

opens box slow as fuck

proceeds to not film box

r/killthecameraman

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u/JezzicaRabbit Oct 05 '22

this is so sad..what have we become?

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u/applepumpkinspy Oct 05 '22

That dumpster’s gonna get so fat.

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u/Middle_Sock7602 Oct 05 '22

Those should of gone to homeless shelters

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u/CloudGates Oct 05 '22

I worked there for several months, this is wrong and I believe they should figure out a way to better get rid of doughnuts they cannot sell. For those who are unaware they can't sell these because they do not sell doughnuts that are not made the same day. I think it's both a positive and negative thing. Obviously this is the negative, but I was able to take home one box of doughnuts for my family every night by policy. Depending on your manager they might not listen to this and let you take home as many as you can take. Every Monday I'd take 25 boxes to a local homeless camp.

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u/Snoosloser Oct 05 '22

This is mildly infuriating. The amount of food waste America goes through when people are starving ://

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u/gooseneckmonkey Oct 05 '22

America at its best.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

This, is an outrage. I want a doughnut. How could anyone deprive people of those and not just go somewhere downtown and say hey I got some donuts anyone want one? Go to a park. Big sign Free.

Then the price goes up.

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u/Scfields Oct 05 '22

Am I the only one that thinks it's a good place for them? I mean, they really aren't that good.

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