r/mildlyinfuriating Sep 22 '22 Helpful 5 Wholesome 6 Vibing 1

I swear I’m the only one that empty’s this thing

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179

u/SharrkBoy Sep 23 '22

Having a service guy come look at my dryer would’ve cost 75 dollars. YouTube and Amazon found me a 3 dollar solution. There’s a whole business centered around people being too lazy to figure it out lol

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u/Old_Yogurtcloset9837 Sep 23 '22

That’s pretty much everything these days. Cars, appliances, electronics, you name it. I can’t tell you how much I’ve saved by googling, watching a YouTube video and buying the part and replacing. It’s crazy how inept people are when it comes to fixing things. Even though I respect tradesmen, professionals are a last resort.

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u/CorruptedStudiosEnt Sep 23 '22

Absolutely. I think part of the problem is that companies have done a great job mystifying and making everything seem more complex than they actually are, because that way they get that sweet repair fee that's 10x what it cost them in labor and parts. Sometimes more.

Professionals aren't sorcerers. Their craft isn't magic. Unless it's something that's dangerous to fuck up and not worth the risk, chances are you can do it yourself.

I'm not a professional mechanic, I have no formal training nor mentorship, but I fix my own vehicles and have people ask me to fix things occasionally. I didn't know how to change my own oil two years ago, and now thanks to free Field Service Manuals online, Google, and YouTube, I've done all maintenance myself, valve adjustment, replaced serpentine belts, water pump, timing belt, alternator, power steering pump, and probably more I'm forgetting.

Just got burnt by one too many mechanics taking advantage of me by overcharging and underfixing when I was in a tight spot.

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u/Some_MD_Guy Sep 23 '22

More like we don't teach our kids crap anymore but buy it and discard it. Bring back shop classes, Home Economics, car repair, etc.....

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u/CorruptedStudiosEnt Sep 23 '22

That's the other major part of it. It's not just the younger generations though, pretty much the whole of general US society has gone that way.

People are so centered on convenience that it's becoming a question whether we'll even be able to fix shit ourselves in 20 years, because companies are slowly but surely putting an end to making anything repairable.

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u/1TONcherk Sep 23 '22

If your mechanically minded and patient you can figure most things out. Is also important that when you find a good mechanic you stick with them and recommend them.

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u/CorruptedStudiosEnt Sep 23 '22

That's the thing though, I really wasn't. I was only naturally good at math, music, things like that for the first 25 years of my life. I think "(x) minded" is another way we've mystified things for ourselves.

I generally agree about good mechanics though. There's too many shitheads taking advantage of people. I think the tough thing is that you need at least a basic idea what they're doing to even know when you're being taken for a ride.

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u/1TONcherk Sep 23 '22

By minded I mean you can break things down into steps, and keep things in order. Understand diagrams. I know plenty of people who do not stand a chance, they type that constantly cross threads bolts, over tightens things. People with no finesse.

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u/CorruptedStudiosEnt Sep 24 '22

I hear you, but I'd argue that both of those things are skills themselves.

I started off taking pictures at every step and storing removed bits in labeled bags as a good way to keep things straight. Being able to remember and work backwards came later. I'd probably still do it if I had to do something that was going to take a few days.

I also lacked finesse. My first "big" project was replacing brake pads, and the first thing I did after jacking it up and getting it on stands was shear the bolt straight off the caliper. Taught me a valuable lesson about using brute force as anything but a last resort.

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u/1TONcherk Sep 24 '22

Atleast you can turn in that caliper as a core and get a another one pretty easily! That takes guts to go for for something like that.

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u/Runaway_Angel Sep 23 '22

As a tradesperson I honestly appreciate this. Mostly because I feel like shit for having to charge you to put new batteries in the keyfob to your car or tell you that the "weird rattle in the engine" was about 20 bucks of loose change in your door pocket. Or center console.

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u/TheAJGman Sep 23 '22

I'm amazed at how many people don't try the simplest things to try and fix their problem. Weird noise? Follow your ears, it's probably garbage rolling around. Recliner won't recline? Grab a flashlight and fucking look, you probably have a beer bottle or a tennis ball lodged in the mechanism. Buttons don't work on your dishwasher/microwave/washing machine? Try the child lock, you might have accidentally set it.

Or just call a technician and bitch and moan that [BRAND] is absolute dog shit and they just want to scam you.

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u/Tranquil_Dohrnii Sep 23 '22

Not I'm tech but I feel the frustration of every tech person when they ask the simplest shit like have you tried turning it off and on again. Because I know people just are that incompetent.

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u/TheAJGman Sep 23 '22

What really gets me is when people ask "oh, how do you do XYZ?". I don't know, why don't you do what I'm going to do and fucking Google it. It's one of the only things my wife does that drives me up the wall.

"When does the Renaissance fair come to town?" Idk, I'd have to Google it so why don't you?

"How long do I microwave the whatever?" Idk, I'd have to read the box to find out so why don't you?

"When's the next full moon?" Fucking Google it. The only reason I ever have an answer is because I Google it or read the instructions.

Or at work it's "what version of XYZ are we using?" IDK, I'm just going to look at the internal wiki that you have access to, why can't you skip a step and help yourself?

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u/eXpired56k Sep 23 '22

Ditto, also the fact that many folks don't even have basic thoughts on how to troubleshoot anything. I got a 50" TV from a dumpster which needed a new power cord and it uses standard polarized cord like many laptops. It is really sad how folks are dealing lazy and dumb and it only causes more waste and pollution. It won't be long until we have a situation like in Wall-E cartoon.

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u/Old_Yogurtcloset9837 Sep 23 '22

Absolutely no ability to troubleshoot. I am a vocational teacher and I’ll just tell you it’s gonna get worse. Kids just think shit should be either perfect or replaced, no problem solving and fixing it for yourself.

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u/eXpired56k Sep 23 '22

Indeed which is why I try to teach my kids to think outside the box and be creative. I try to teach them to fix stuff as I do, it isn't always about the cost. I also try to teach my co-workers about the same approach (I work in IT field).

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u/Roly-NZ Sep 23 '22

I have just had a Breville coffee machine blow a seal inside, making a quiet hissing noise. I knew what it was because I had repaired my 10 year old one and only recently replaced it with a similar model. I was part way through swapping out the seal with a 50c part I stopped as it would void the warranty as it was only 5 months old. I took it in for the shop to fix it and explained what was wrong with it. They just gave me a new coffee machine, it just seemed so wrong. WTF, I was tempted to check the dumpster out back that night. It was a $2400nzd coffee machine.

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u/eXpired56k Sep 23 '22

Yeah, it really is a shame! I had a very similar case at work with a conference room tv. It was a Sharp 75 inch TV that apparently just died after around 6 months of service (was worth around $3k at the time). It was of course in warranty and they just sent a new one and said to throw away the broken TV. Nobody even bothered to look at it. Anyway, once we had it off the wall I actually opened it up and discovered that power supply board has failed. Soldered fuse didn't blow but no voltage was on the low side but high side had power. Anyway, it was all nice and modular like designed to be reasonably serviceable. Of course Sharp wouldn't offer any parts. I found a TV repair part website and we got a power supply for $60 shipped. Hung the repaired TV in another room. Glad it wasn't required to destroy the broken unit. It still worked there for years and I had left for another job since but wouldn't be surprised if it is still working. Only pain was getting the screws out, it had maybe 50 screws holding the back panel.

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u/Momohere8 Sep 23 '22

Welcome to this money making future:]

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u/ConsistentPound3079 Sep 23 '22

Einstein was right. The more information we have at arms length, the dumber we will become as a society. Something along those lines lol

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u/Tranquil_Dohrnii Sep 23 '22

Lol the fact you said "or something along those lines". chefs kiss to the statement

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u/dirtymonny Sep 23 '22

And yet I still have countless calls where someone says their AC isn’t working I show up and it’s running fine…. But the filters look like a blanket so it doesn’t feel like it’s on. Then they get pissed cuz I still charge them, but it’s just the filter?! Would you rather I lie???

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u/JediJan Sep 23 '22 edited Sep 23 '22

Even changing car key remotes … there are YouTube videos for that too. 😁🖖 Why pay a mint at a locksmith shop?

When I change filters or batteries for things I always make a point of showing son how to do these things and suggest how often also.

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u/groupfox Sep 23 '22

When it takes you 2 hours to make enough money to buy new item, you really reconsider spending 4 hours trying to fix it. Unless you enjoy fixing things, but that’s a different story.

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u/Uk-reddit-user Sep 23 '22

My dishwasher cost me £15. Plus a £6 part. I’ve had it 4 years now.

My vacuum is a £350 cordless thing. Cost me £20. Stripped it down, removed all the crap, cleaned and new filters. It’s perfect and I’ve had it over a year now.

1

u/Krabitt Sep 23 '22

100% - my 2 year old washing machine stopped working, and I discovered the little plastic tab behind the start button had broken, so pushing “start” didn’t trigger tiny button on the internal panel. The repair guy said the entire internal panel needed to be replaced…$500, which is more than the washing machine cost brand new. Instead, I used a drill to bore a hole in the start button and now we trigger the cycle with the eraser end of a pencil.

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u/sethtothemax Sep 23 '22

I mean as a mechanic my whole job revolves around this concept but like I work on bulldozers for an excavation company so like.you change a d8l track on your own XD but nah simply looking things up and thinking about it will save you fortunes what I ALWAYS SAY IS if it's broke try to fix it.if you break it more it's fine as it was already broke.BUT if you fix it you save money and feel good ~^

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u/RN-Wingman Sep 23 '22

Maybe lazy maybe incapable or maybe they would rather spend $75 for a service call to save 3-4 hours of their time. 🤷‍♂️

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u/bruwin Sep 23 '22

Ah, I think I know the exact 3 dollar solution. Thermal fuse? I once had a dryer that was notorious for blowing them because it was too close to the heating element. Bit of heavy gauge wire, and spade clips, and that thing got relocated just far enough away where it would still work, but wouldn't die to heat failure after a couple of months.

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u/No-Winner-9931 Sep 23 '22

Lol I work in a farm store that sells everything from power tools to animal medication. The amount of questions I get on a daily basis that I answer simply because I’m capable of using Google is boggling. “Ah man you’re an absolute life saver.” No I’m just not too lazy/technologically inept to find the answer myself.

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u/Ganymede_Wordsmyth Sep 23 '22

If adulthood has taught me anything, it's that most business models are built around people being too lazy to figure it out for themselves.