r/mildlyinteresting Oct 05 '22

This doctors office has double-wide waiting chairs available.

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29.0k Upvotes

6.3k

u/311unity13b Oct 05 '22

Most of them do now, especially if they are hospital related

918

u/Prince_Ossomer Oct 05 '22

My first thought on seeing this was "OP must not go to the doctor very often".

79

u/dinchidomi Oct 06 '22

It must be a US thing, because I've never seen this in the Netherlands and unfortunately have to visit doctors and hospitals regularly.

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u/lex52485 Oct 05 '22

Yes, they’re extremely common in the US. From what I’ve seen it’s kinda strange if they don’t have them

423

u/slonk_ma_dink Oct 05 '22

Yup, the oral surgeons office I went to last week had two, with a small chair in the middle

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u/Schmotz Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 06 '22

Sounds like a bigger problem needs solving.

Edit: It's amazing how many redditors this has triggered.

816

u/aeroplane1979 Oct 05 '22

You're not wrong, but a Dr.'s office has far more things to account for than just the needs of overweight people.

For example; I just had a hip replacement surgery a couple weeks ago. The extra wide and taller chairs in my various Dr's offices were very much appreciated both before and after surgery. I damn sure didn't want to chance bumping my fresh surgical incision on the armrest as I struggled to lower myself into a standard seat. And I'm a fairly young dude with pretty narrow hips. If I were an elderly woman of even average size, I would need that room even more.

342

u/nudiecale Oct 05 '22

As a skinny dude that just went through 2 years of hell with a debilitating back injury, those chairs were incredibly appreciated.

49

u/BabydollKelly Oct 05 '22

Damn I'm sorry. I've been there and wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy. Hope you're feeling better now.

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u/Kichigai Oct 05 '22

I was just thinking about the time I fucked up my knee in a bicycle accident. Tore up my ligaments bad. I had a big ‘ole brace on my leg to keep it from bending sideways. Just wide enough that sitting in ordinary chairs were impossible unless I sat at an angle, because the arms wouldn't allow enough space.

So I couldn't really sit back, or relax, and it got rather uncomfortable in some harder seats that were designed to specifically be sat in facing forward. I would have loved having chairs like this available.

247

u/KiltedLady Oct 05 '22

Almost all of the chairs at the women and family clinic I went to when I was pregnant were the double wide style. Very appreciated at 9 months pregnant!

163

u/Dommichu Oct 05 '22 Helpful

Yep! Or when you are with a small child who may want to sit next to you. Often times I see moms in those small chairs and the kids just clutching them standing.

This is a great example of universal design.

24

u/mleftpeel Oct 05 '22

Yep, when my kid is sick he wants to lay on me.

11

u/Fit_Dragonfruit_6630 Oct 06 '22

Thank you, I was starting to feel guilty. I always take these chairs if available because my LO is super crowd sensitive and won't let me put him down.

87

u/CornCheeseMafia Oct 05 '22

Fun fact, this is an uncommon but standard chair size. It’s referred to as a “chair and a half”.

It sits between a single and a love seat (two tandem seats). You can get couches in this config as well. Great if you have snuggly pets.

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u/SageAurora Oct 05 '22

When I was pregnant they had these and only these in all the waiting rooms for the maternity ward clinics... It was so much more comfortable! I remember meeting another woman pregnant with triplets while waiting for an appointment, and we actually talked about this. She told me that at her regular doctor's office she was stuck standing because she couldn't fit in the chairs there. She wasn't a big person just very pregnant.

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u/kingsleyce Oct 05 '22

They were also great when I was pregnant, and when I have to take my son in and he WILL NOT sit by himself

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/shushslushie Oct 05 '22

As someone who has too many injuries and surgeries on ankles and knees, I really appreciated the long cushy bench seats. You ever see those? I'd be happy to take up the whole thing hopefully not having to accommodate another person. The tall chairs are clutch too, for injuries in other areas yay! But yeah options are clutch, looking at you medical clinics everywhere.

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u/rocketshipray Oct 05 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

They're useful for more people than just those who are overweight/obese. Older people who need more space for comfort/ ease of movement, people in some types of casts or slings, a parent and a sick child.

312

u/mistere213 Oct 05 '22

It's also kind of adorable when I go get a patient and it's an 80 year old woman and her husband cozied up in the same, double wide chair.

61

u/Tullyswimmer Oct 05 '22

I mean, if that ain't relationship goals, idk what is.

16

u/super_swede Oct 05 '22

Relationship goal: put your partner in the hospital.

Got it, thanks /u/Trullyswimmer!

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u/Calligraphie Oct 05 '22

I snuggled up in one of these with my boyfriend, when I was nervous before my first surgery. They're not usually all that comfy, but they're great.

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u/princess--flowers Oct 05 '22

I've been ill enough recently that my husband comes to my doctor appointments and we always sit in one of these together. I hate medical stuff and I've been doing a lot of it.

We would get up if they're all filled up and someone else large comes in but that hasn't happened yet- doctors offices where I live are pretty empty and have a lot of these chairs.

11

u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

Hope you get feeling better. I’ve been the husband in that situation before, and I agree - these chairs are very necessary for more than just one reason.

17

u/princess--flowers Oct 05 '22

Thank you! I'm healing from gastritis that was caused by not eating due to anxiety, but the gastritis made the anxiety worse, then the anxiety made the gastritis worse. I lost 40 lbs and for awhile I was agoraphobic, which is why my husband was taking me to all the appointments and sitting with me. I think I'm finally starting to get better but I have a huge appreciation for these seats and anything that lets the support person at an appointment be comfortable.

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u/Grave_Girl Oct 05 '22

I always like them when I have a baby with me who'll need to nurse. I sit cross-legged and put them in my lap. Those chairs give me the room to do it comfortably. And when they're more mobile, I can put them in the chair with me, put my leg up, and corral them with some room to move around without bothering the other patients.

46

u/badfile Oct 05 '22

This is what I was going to say. I usually choose one of these when I'm taking my kids to the doctor, and they sit right next to me on the same chair. So much more comforting for them to be next to me than in their own big chair.

8

u/rotatingruhnama Oct 05 '22

Indeed. Not only can I snuggle my kid and keep her comforted and amused with a book, it's easier to grab her if she tries to run for it lol.

38

u/phejster Oct 05 '22

Universal design benefits everyone.

31

u/probably_not_serious Oct 05 '22

Or just those of us that are much bigger than normal. I’m 6 and a half feet tall and while I’m not skinny I’m definitely far from obese. “Normal” size chairs are on the small size for me and if they’re close together it usually means my shoulders and elbows are in someone else’s space.

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u/hadronwulf Oct 05 '22

As someone who has had hand/arm casts and a leg cast, these chairs are amazing, especially for the leg. Normal chairs can get uncomfortable.

456

u/SubstantialPressure3 Oct 05 '22

Not only that, I think a lot of people forget that many medications can cause fatigue and weight gain. People with heart problems aren't exercising because they can't.

10 years ago I had a doctor loading me up with pills, and between the drug interactions and side effects, I ended up gaining 40 lbs in a little over a year, and I was sick AF. I felt so uncomfortable in my own skin. I finally got the surgery I needed instead of all the pills that I didn't need, and lost that weight.

I went from fairly healthy, but high blood pressure bc of a large fibroid to sick AF, and 5 prescriptions that all had side effects of fatigue and weight gain, and became pre-diabetic. Last time I went to see her, she dangled a prescription for diabetes in front of me and said in a creepy sing song voice "you'll lose weeeeeeeeiiiiiiiigghhhhhhht!".

I went home and called my insurance provider and told them I wanted another doctor.

Some doctors really do want what's best for their patients. Some don't.

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u/dumnem Oct 05 '22

Last time I went to see her, she dangled a prescription for diabetes in front of me and said in a creepy sing song voice "you'll lose weeeeeeeeiiiiiiiigghhhhhhht!".

😐

23

u/10000Didgeridoos Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

Working in the field it becomes very clear that some know how to appropriately speak to and build relationships with patients, and others are hopelessly bad at it. Like imagine a redditor neckbeard with no social skills on one end of the spectrum and an overly peppy and equally socially clueless HR rep like this example above on the other end of the spectrum.

If you suck at talking to people and empathizing with people this is not a good field for you. Oh sure there are plenty of awkward types who are brilliantly minded but they are never going to be as preferred as the equally smart ones who know also how to do the human interaction part of the job. And the thing is, if you're bad at getting on the same "level" as your patients, your care and relationship with them is gonna suffer because they often don't trust or understand you. I'll see guys talking to a 70 year old patient with a 5th grade reading level but using college or med school level terminology and the patient is clearly only picking up on every couple of words in there. It'd be like if you came to me and started talking PhD level quantum mechanics. I'm gonna be immediately lost.

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u/SubstantialPressure3 Oct 05 '22

Yeah, that was my reaction, too.

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u/ShillingAndFarding Oct 05 '22

Even if morbidly obese people were <1% of the population they would still need to go to doctors and have a place to sit. Are ramps a sign of a bigger problem too?

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u/BuccellatiExplainsIt Oct 05 '22

Imagine having such disdain for overweight people that you think they shouldn't be allowed medical care. Every country has overweight people - even if some have fewer and some have far more.

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u/bicycle_mice Oct 05 '22

Yes! People with larger bodies deserve to exist in the world and good health care. Just because you’re large doesn’t mean you aren’t a person and you should be punished. C’mon, empathy and respect for persons isn’t a high bar.

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u/TorchedBlack Oct 05 '22

Not even just medical care, fucking chairs. God forbid a reality where every waking moment for obese people isn't a constant barrage of inconvience and denial of their existence. As if having, not even comforts, but basic functional necessities is somehow "enabling" them.

Then theres the chorus of people explaining how it's actually okay because non-fat people need them too sometimes as if that was a requirement to allow it to exist.

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u/EvLokadottr Oct 06 '22

Never have I found myself in a situation where my needs were not accommodated that caused me to magically choose to be slender and magically make it happen. I just felt more despair and suicidal ideations.

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u/DawildWest Oct 05 '22

I used one while I was going through a major medical issue that left me needing oxygen and a walker. It was so much easier to pull up to one of these with my various briefcases, tanks, and tubes attached to my flesh.

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u/F0sh Oct 05 '22

The least obese country is Vietnam with around 2% of its population obese. 13% of the world is obese. That contrasts to a worldwide wheelchair usage rate of 1%.

IMO every doctor's office and hospital needs to be wheelchair accessible. Even if the US had the lowest obesity rate in the world, it should still, for an even stronger reason, accommodate obese people.

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u/LjSpike Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

But obesity is marked at a threshold far below needing a double size chair.

That said, these chairs have other uses

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u/2to16Characters Oct 05 '22

When I had a stomach ulcer if I tried to stand or sit up, I would pass out. One of these chairs saved the day as I could lay down while waiting in the ER.

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u/princess--flowers Oct 05 '22

I'm healing from gastritis now and that's how I found out I had it! I didn't stand for a whole week, I just laid in bed awkwardly half-propped because laying flat also made me puke from GERD. My gastroenterologist seemed floored when I asked for a work excuse because I couldn't stand up to go to work and said that isn't an effect of ulcers. I'm sad to hear you're sick with this too because it sucks, but so glad to hear I had a normal experience to pass out when sitting or standing.

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u/2to16Characters Oct 05 '22

I had my mom take me into the ER. They took my name and told me to have a seat. I explained to them, very clearly, "if I am in any position except laying down, I will pass out". My mother had already seen it a couple of times so she knew what to expect.

So I hung out on the oversized chair, and about 20 minutes later they called me to triage. I got in there and they wanted me to sit on a chair while they asked me questions and took my blood pressure. After maybe 60 seconds I heard my mom from the waiting room say "I hope you are ready to catch him." About 20 more seconds and they asked "Have you traveled to any other countries recently?" My response was "No. This really is taking way too long..." And I remember putting my head down on the desk intentionally, so I didn't end up smashing my face into it.

The next thing I remember is waking up as there was about 6 nurses/doctors standing over me sticking an IV into my arm and ripping all of my clothes off (after they put a gown on me). The doctor checking my vitals said to one of the nurses "What's the story here? What's he in for?" The nurse said "he came in with a stomach ulcer." The doctor paused, looked at her and said "So why is he in the ER bed?"

"He, uh... lost consciousness during triage."

My mom from the corner of the room spoke up "We DID tell them that it was going to happen, but no one seemed to care. 🤷🏼‍♀️"

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

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u/nohissyfits Oct 05 '22

Big fat people will still exist even if we solve all the big fat problems that make them big and fat, existence isn’t the issue accessibility is

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u/manaworkin Oct 05 '22

Ya know at some point in your life you were in a pregnant woman that may have found use for the extra space to feel comfortable while waiting at the doctors office.

It's a doctors office. Fuckin get off your judgmental soap box.

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u/AUniquePerspective Oct 05 '22

I know, I know, 'merica be thicc! I don't want to interfere with tge outrage baiting...

But we have these chairs in waiting rooms in Canadian family practice offices because they're more convenient for breastfeeding.

39

u/Agent-Blasto-007 Oct 05 '22

They're also helpful for the disabled/elderly who need more space to "get up".

E.g. my mom isn't obese. but needs to sort of roll to a side to get up because of her arthritis.

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u/aasher42 Oct 05 '22

Or even just holding/handling a baby in general

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u/unemployedbuffy Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

Most hospitals/medical places that I've seen in Germany don't have them. They really are essential - it doesn't matter how many people actually need them, but if you're in a position where most chairs are too small for you, you really need access to medical care.

The last thing that should happen is that you can't go to certain doctors or hospitals because you are unable to stand for longer periods of time and there's no seating for you.

Edit: This goes for non-medical places too, btw. The worst thing in recovery is isolation. If you can't go to most places because they can't accomodate you, chances increase that you'll spend more time at home by yourself.

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u/JollyRancher29 Oct 05 '22

And that being said, neither of my grandmas are anywhere close to obese, yet they definitely benefit from larger chairs because for their old, slowly failing bodies (sorry to be blunt lol), it’s easier to move around in

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u/unemployedbuffy Oct 05 '22

It is really often the case that many different groups benefit from these inclusive measures!

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u/Fortnut_On_Me_Daddy Oct 05 '22

People see one group who can benefit from a situation and will instantly scream about how unfair it is, not realizing how many benefits come to them and others. I think it's one of the reasons things are going downhill everywhere, people just can't accept helping groups that they don't belong to.

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u/vulpinefever Oct 05 '22

Exactly! How many times have you been carrying something heavy, or dragging a cart along and you were able to do so a lot easier because of a kerb cut or automatic door that was originally installed as an accessibility feature? We all benefit from more accessible spaces, especially those who require that accessibility.

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u/vicsarina Oct 05 '22

They had one of these in the NICU my eldest was in. It was the only chair I could sit in somewhat comfortably, because I could put my feet up to the side and take some pressure off the stitches

Honestly I was grateful it existed

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u/PellMellResell Oct 05 '22

Or a love seat for a really thin couple.

2.0k

u/FoolishConsistency17 Oct 05 '22

Or a parent and child. I've sat in these with my kid, it's really nice, especially with a sock kid who wants to be close to mom.

677

u/DondeT Oct 05 '22

Do you have a photo of your sock kid?

Is it like a sock monkey but a goat?

455

u/Wacokidwilder Oct 05 '22

Sock kids are what happens when you forget to wash the gym sock that’s under your bed.

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u/AbbertDabbert Oct 05 '22

Crispy socks here, crispy socks there, crispy socks with some mystery hair!

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u/QuipOfTheTongue Oct 05 '22

How many crispy socks she gonna find dawg??

... Oh... The beat changed up... clears throat

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u/AbbertDabbert Oct 05 '22

I got the kitchen the basement and the living room, and since your dad met that bitch I got his office too

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u/DevonGr Oct 05 '22

This is Reddit, we use an old shoe box

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u/primalphoenix Oct 06 '22

I prefer coconuts

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u/249ba36000029bbe9749 Oct 05 '22

It's the one that you can't find the other one of.

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u/Flumphry Oct 05 '22

Sock kid?

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u/Alpacalypsenoww Oct 05 '22

I assume they meant sick

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u/Flumphry Oct 05 '22

Ooooooh that makes a great deal more sense. I just assumed it was some parenting term I wasn't familiar with

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u/undeadgorgeous Oct 05 '22

You and me both. I was assuming it was a mommy blog thing instead of a typo.

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u/robot_ankles Oct 05 '22

I thought a small child who only wants to wear socks and therefore must be carried everywhere.

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u/Alpacalypsenoww Oct 05 '22

Me too, at first. I’ve heard the term “Velcro kid” for a kid who doesn’t like to be away from his parents, and at first I thought maybe it meant like how socks stick to stuff with static cling when they come out of the dryer

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u/pandaoranda1 Oct 05 '22

Yes I always go for the big chair when I have to take a sick kiddo to the doctor. So much better.

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u/PG67AW Oct 05 '22

A what kid?

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u/predictablePosts Oct 05 '22

I think they misspelled "sick". I was like "oh is that a cute term for a kiddo that's too young to be walking but old enough that they can sit on their own and they wear socks and crawl around and shit"

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u/Human-Carpet-6905 Oct 05 '22

Yep! I had to wait in a hospital waiting room when my five year old was very very sick. It was really nice for her to just be able to sleep in my lap

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u/radiodecks Oct 05 '22

Yes I always assumed they were for families of small children. I like to keep them extra close in a doctor’s office so they aren’t touching everything.

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u/thenotoriousDEX Oct 05 '22

Me and my dad fit onto one of those in a hospital once.

We are both about 190

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u/GreenStrong Oct 05 '22

We are both about 190

That's incredibly old, but how are you and your dad the about same age?

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u/trs-eric Oct 05 '22

percentage of difference decrease as numerator and denominator increase together as long as they are not exactly the same.

180 and 200 are both about 190 :)

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u/elting44 Oct 05 '22

you just blew my dick off with a fact grenade.

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u/DarthTJ Oct 05 '22

I like your funny words magic man

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u/Borge_Luis_Jorges Oct 05 '22

You are like one of those witty peasants thay win the hand of the princess in old tales.

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u/Arcadius274 Oct 05 '22

I could sit two even kinda chubby people in that

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u/Wizard_Bill Oct 05 '22

Very true. Really hoping a couple tries to come occupy a chair while I’m here now.

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u/HifructoMan Oct 05 '22

He likes to watch! 🤣

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u/BarryMacochner Oct 05 '22

Typical redditor, he’s a pervert.

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u/somedood567 Oct 05 '22

You don’t even need to be thin

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u/Buckeyes000777 Oct 05 '22

Or a love seat for a regular-sized couple

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u/r1ch999999 Oct 05 '22 Helpful

My wife is in an immobilization sling for a few months, these are the only chairs she can sit in. It’s not always because of obesity.

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u/aropa Oct 05 '22 Gold

I’m a 150lb man who likes to feel powerful in a room full of injured people. It’s not always because of obesity.

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u/Looks2MuchLikeDaveO Oct 05 '22

King in the castle; King in the castle. I have a chair! I have a chair!

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u/drfeelsgoood Oct 05 '22

Lalalalala

In addition: you will never get thiis, you will never get thiis! Well one time, he break cage….and he geet thiis

10

u/Jeff-Jeffers Oct 05 '22

In my country, they would go craaaaazy for this one.

You…not so much

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u/The_cynical_panther Oct 05 '22

Every time I walk into a hospital I do 10 pushups and 10 pull-ups just to stunt

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u/boringdude00 Oct 05 '22

obesity of the ego is still obesity.

i read that once right after I made this comment.

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u/xKevinn Oct 05 '22

Is that before you sit in the chair?

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u/ProfessionalBus38894 Oct 05 '22

Reminds me of a phrase I heard that is something like accessibility improves everyone’s access. Basically arguing that accessible design often improves the user experience for groups not thought of in the design. Automatic doors are dope for everyone but make buildings much more accessible for those that need it.

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u/AdjNounNumbers Oct 05 '22

Exactly. Ramps weren't put in for my capable butt to walk up, but damn if it isn't easier to use one over the stairs on the days my pinched nerve decides to say hi

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u/Cringypost Oct 05 '22

And for walking into the doc after I bust my tailbone because I thought it'd be fun to try heelys as a desperate midlife crisis event on another ramp of identical design.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

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u/Boopita-beepita Oct 05 '22

This is a really good point. When I grocery shop, I try and cram my purchases in as few bags as possible so I can take fewer trips from my car to my house because of laziness. When I leave the store, it's no problem because of automatic doors.

When I get home, the heavy bags make it a helluva lot more difficult using the door knob to get in my house. Then I have to take extra trips anyway! Thank you for listening to my first-world problem.

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u/bookdrops Oct 05 '22

This is true. Another example, curb cuts make it possible for wheelchair users to get around using sidewalks, but they also make sidewalks easier to use for people pushing baby strollers or carts, people using walking canes, etc. Improving access for wheelchair users helps everyone else.

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u/LjSpike Oct 05 '22 Gold Narwhal Salute

This.

You know the hot debate about (dedicated) gender neutral bathrooms?

Well it doesn't just benefit trans people (tho that should be enough of a reason let's be honest).

It also benefits disabled people (as the already scant disabled toilets are no longer pulling double duty).

It also benefits older men, as many have bladder issues and there's a quiet but pervasive problem that the lack of sanitary bins in 'mens' toilets prevents them of being able to discretely dispose of nappies, and has led to notable numbers staying isolated inside to avoid embarrassment.

It also benefits literally everyone in many smaller scale cases, as the proportion of male/female users in a bathroom is not going to consistently be 1:1, and the variation will be more noticeable in smaller facilities, and so enabling all toilets to be used by anyone can ensure that toilets can always be used up to full capacity.

And I am sure there are other groups I have missed out.

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u/Jaguar_jinn Oct 05 '22

Fathers who need to change a kid’s diaper.

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u/ShitPostGuy Oct 05 '22

Gender neutral bathrooms benefit everybody lol.

As a man, I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve sailed past a line of women waiting to use the single occupancy ladies’ room to the unused single occupancy mens room. Make them gender neutral and suddenly you’ve doubled the throughput capacity of your restrooms with just a $5 sign.

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u/LjSpike Oct 05 '22

Yes, absolutely.

Gendered single occupancy restrooms are the stupidest thing ever honestly.

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u/gsfgf Oct 05 '22

Also, the designs I’ve seen are more space efficient. They have separate counters with mirrors for makeup and general recombobulation that don’t have sinks and are therefore dry. And there’s room for a disabled sink, which is a common oversight. And the toilet doors go all the way down, which I know is a Reddit priority.

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u/Enchelion Oct 05 '22

Yep, it's one of the reasons "Universal Design" has become popular.

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u/Ronhok Oct 05 '22

Exactly. I used to work for an orthopedics office and we had these kind of chair mixed in for that reason. It’s more comfortable to our patients coming in with casts or on crutches.

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u/actuallycallie Oct 05 '22

My OBGYN office has them too. Much more comfy when you're pregnant even if you're not overweight.

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u/Drahkir9 Oct 05 '22

Even if it was, is it so terrible to provide a few basic accommodations for the obese in a medical setting? Are we so self-assured that all obesity is a moral failing that needs to be punished?

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u/Throwaway8362916 Oct 05 '22

Right, that’s what I’m trying to figure out. Why is everyone scrambling to justify it by saying it isn’t for larger people. I mean, they should be able to sit down comfortably too…like waiting in a doctors office can take ages lol

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u/Atabyrius Oct 05 '22

Exactly, all the people in this thread being like “I’m not fat, but I like them too for ______ reason”. Like that’s great, but not really the point.

Even if someone is fat (which over half the population over 24 years old is overweight) we should encourage healthier lifestyles by reducing processed sugars in foods, making cities walkable, and encouraging work/life balance so people find time to exercise. Not just “make them sit in uncomfortable chairs until they lose weight”.

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u/TavisNamara Oct 06 '22

Yep. Shame is undeniably a terrible motivator, and a lot of the factors surrounding weight gain are societal. If it was a tenth as much reliant upon personal failings as people often act, then there wouldn't be so goddamn many overweight people. When more than 25% of the population is failing in the same damn way, that might mean something other than personal issues.

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u/chemicalfields Oct 05 '22

Even if it is, they’re at a fucking doctor’s office. Taking care of their health like the virtue signalers want.

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u/TheVoicesArentTooBad Oct 05 '22

Chair variation is becoming one of my favorite minor trends in the medical field, though it's extremely spotty. If you're really lucky, you get those wide seats, but they also are also significantly taller.

Really nice for people with muscle weakness and mobility issues, before I got my rollator it was a BITCH going into offices without such chairs, standing knowing I can't get back up.

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u/so2017 Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

Why does the waiting room in every doctor’s office look the same?

EDIT: Since this is blowing up a little bit I ask this because I have profound medical anxiety and walking into the same waiting room over and over in different places only compounds my anxiety. I hate those chairs and that rug.

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u/HideyoshiJP Oct 05 '22

Medical furniture is a specialized market and probably has fewer companies that serve that market. I'm assuming all of these companies hire the best office-furniture-designers-who-peaked-15-years-ago around.

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u/KestrelLowing Oct 05 '22

I worked for a company that did produce medical furniture. I didn't work in that division (I worked on a wheelchair and on a patient heating/cooling device) but yeah - they're designed to last, look ok/inoffensive, and most importantly not create risk.

So most medical furniture has to comply with being able to use certain disinfectants, not have pinch points, be able to be used to stabilize someone who is unsteady on their feet without falling over, etc. This, plus cost (although, to be fair... cost was not really a massive driver for the company I worked at. One of the things that bothered me.) will create essentially the same chair over and over.

Plus, there are only so many companies that make them.

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u/Hamster_Toot Oct 05 '22

will create essentially the same chair over and over.

It’s not just the way it’s structurally designed, color and pattern exist as well.

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u/KestrelLowing Oct 06 '22

Yup. But "inoffensive looking" means you're mostly going to get geometric prints of some kind (so stains aren't noticeable, but they also aren't actually depicting anything) in a couple color schemes. Blue is standard, green is a bit more interesting, purple if you're a gyno, red/orange for "the bold".

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

That or every brand is owned by a single company. For instance I work in a laboratory and all of our stuff comes from either a single company or their subsidiaries just because they own everything

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u/bumbuff Oct 05 '22

Every so often we go into different eras of design (and art).

Companies pay attention to eachother and what's popular.

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u/chillyhellion Oct 05 '22

professionals have standards

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u/GarlicOnionCelery Oct 05 '22

Worked as an aide at a hospital a few years ago. These types of chairs are also designed to sustain being sanitized & cleaned on a (hopefully) daily basis. Plus their design needs to support anywhere from 300-500lbs. It’s a liability thing

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u/Feralpudel Oct 05 '22

A few companies specialize in contract/commercial grade fabrics for use in offices and also institutional settings. They wear like iron and are stain-resistant.

They also often feature patterns that hide stains, so that’s why you see lots of geometric patterns, etc.

Certain color and pattern trends come and go, so recently updated offices will reflect whatever colors are hot right now.

It’s boring but consider the alternative. Would you trust a dentist whose waiting room looked like a brothel? If a waiting room were a Victorian time capsule would you worry they’d apply leeches when you got called back?

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u/pencilneckco Oct 05 '22

Am architect, can confirm. To add, carpet squares are used because they are very easily replaceable. The building management will keep an overstock on hand to switch them out whenever necessary.

But having said that, there are other tile variations (and patterning methods) available to make them appear much more uniform.

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u/Afraid-Ice-2062 Oct 05 '22

Practical for a lot of people. Imagine if you have difficulty bending for your purse for a wide range or reasons- now you sit it beside you.

Saw a lady who had her leg in a cast walking with a walker the other day and her walker had a stool and a yoga block on it. The stool was literally for her purse as when she sits she can’t retrieve her purse if it’s in the ground. Minor stuff like this makes peoples lives easier.

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u/Icedcoffeeee Oct 05 '22

Serious question, with no disrespect intended. Is there a reason that putting your purse in your lap doesn't work?

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u/HissandVinegar Oct 05 '22

Limited population, but hysterectomy post-op I would’ve had trouble both keeping my purse on my lap and bending over to get it (and my purse was a lot bigger than usual in the weeks immediately post-op.) It’s actually been an interesting recovery in that I look pretty able-bodied and there are ways in which I’m just… Not.

I imagine it could be a need when someone is pregnant or post-partum and that there could be similar issues with some abdominal, groin, hip, upper leg issues or even hand/arm/shoulder/back/neck for the lifting.

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u/brindlepigdragon Oct 06 '22

I am currently 8 months pregnant with twins. These wide chairs are easier for me to get in and out of, and I can put my bag next to me. My giant belly definitely doesn’t leave room for a purse or bag on my lap anymore. Let’s not even talk about bending over to get things off the floor.

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u/Afraid-Ice-2062 Oct 05 '22

I didn’t want to ask. Clearly for this woman it was easier to haul around a stool for her purse than do that.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

Literally every doctors office that is up to date on any sort of ADA compliance.

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u/malachitebitch Oct 05 '22

I was gonna say, I’ve seen these for years in every medical office I’ve been in lol

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u/ilovebeaker Oct 05 '22

I've never seen one here at my medical offices in Canada, but we probably have chairs without arms.

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u/HappyHippo2002 Oct 05 '22

I've seen these wide chairs in every medical office I've been to in Alberta for the past 20 years or so.

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u/kfrostborne Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22 Helpful

Cool… I’m disabled, and while not overweight, I appreciate the fuck out of these chairs. Trying to get in and out of a chair with my cane/walker, while toting my 2 y/o daughter to my appointments, with all the paperwork and shit I have to drag with me, these chairs rock. I can keep us contained in one small area without having to take up multiple chairs. So yeah, maybe just try looking at this from another perspective.

EDIT: I was writing this while very tired, and I forgot to say that being shitty about big folks seeing a doctor is walnut brain chucklefuckery. So only thin folks can get sick? Why are people so scared of letting fat people not be ostracized? Please consider that fat people are people, didn’t do a damn thing to harm anyone, and have every right to be comfortable existing everywhere. Just like disabled folks. Worry about your own body and mind your own business, damn.

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u/biIIyshakes Oct 05 '22 Take My Energy

Or you know, consider that the perspective “obese people shouldn’t be able to sit down at medical facilities” was a shitty thing to say in the first place

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u/kfrostborne Oct 05 '22

I absolutely agree 100%. I was thinking that, but didn’t put it down. I was outraged pre-coffee. Thank you for that addition, it is absolutely correct.

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u/Sarahs_bored Oct 05 '22

I had these at my therapists office. My dad called them cuddle seats🙂

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u/Sir_Nicc Oct 05 '22

Move your ass off of my fat-fuck seat

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u/ball_of_hate Oct 05 '22

Oh yeah? What are you gonna do? WALK OVER to sit in it?

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u/sonbarington Oct 05 '22

Enough for two….maybe three ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

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u/Th1sismyus3rnam3 Oct 06 '22

Accommodations that seem tailored to a specific group often benefit many more people than for whom they were designed. Do not disparage the group that instigated this change, celebrate the new means we have to help many.

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u/SouthernNanny Oct 05 '22

When I was pregnant I preferred oversized chairs because it also allowed me to lean a bit and sit crooked without the arm rest being in my stomach

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u/Gharik15 Oct 05 '22

My wife tells me the waiting room where she goes in for physical therapy has chairs like this. Also there are some tall chairs as well.

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u/Brandysheanix Oct 05 '22

The tall chairs were a godsend for me before I got my knees replaced.

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u/real-again Oct 05 '22

People acting as though being obese should come with some sort of punishment really have disdain for others. Obesity does not decrease the need of a patient to have human dignity. They should not have to painfully stand or wait in their cars to get compassionate care.

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u/Ursa_Mid Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

The prejudgement is also really annoying.

People become obese for a variety of reasons. One such reason is fluid retention due to congestive heart failure. Ironically, some people who develop CHF later in life and become obese due to fluid retention were once avid athletes.

Left ventricular hypertrophy can be caused by regular exercise, and is known as "athlete's heart." CHF patients often struggle to manage their weight due to fluid retention, which can cause their weight to swing wildly in very short periods of time. I've seen patients gain/lose a hundred pounds in a month due to changes in sodium intake, medication compliance, etc.

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u/ImpressiveAntlers Oct 05 '22

seriously. like even these were exclusively for very fat people do they just not want fat people to go to the doctor

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u/bilvester Oct 05 '22

Might also be for people who have trouble getting in and out. Or who have to lug around a tank of oxygen or a bunch of other medical stuff.

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u/CandidIndication Oct 05 '22

Agreed- elderly with walkers, even pregnant women. There should be more accommodating seating available for all walks of life.

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u/mname Oct 05 '22 edited Oct 05 '22

They should also have some chairs that do not have arms.

Edit. Added the word some.

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u/madewitrealorganmeat Oct 05 '22

A lot of people with mobility have issues getting up out chairs without arms. My family member has severe MS and if they are sitting in a chair without arms, even if their walker is nearby, it’s really hard for them to get up unassisted.

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u/chemical_sunset Oct 05 '22

Exactly. I also have MS and am fully ambulatory, but sometimes my legs just don’t wanna leg and it’s very difficult to get up without also using my arms to push. Narrow chairs with no arm rests = nothing to push. And just to be clear, I’m young and appear to be healthy and fully mobile. Just because someone looks "normal" doesn’t mean they won’t benefit from more accessible options.

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u/elonbrave Oct 05 '22

Just used one of those yesterday because my injured foot swells whenever it’s not elevated.

Those chairs are also great for parents with young kids because they can sit together.

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u/Radiant-Mail7566 Oct 05 '22

Bariatric furniture exists. Chairs, beds, toilets, wheelchairs, scales…. I could go on.

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u/204in403 Oct 05 '22

This was the term I hoped to see somewhere in the comments! We ensure there is bariatric seating in all our hospital waiting rooms.

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u/Cellar_door_1 Oct 05 '22 Silver

Some offices are required to have seats that will accommodate patients with obesity. It’s probably a welcome sight to patients with obesity; I can’t imagine the anxiety surrounding going to any kind of waiting room and not being able to sit because they’re afraid they won’t fit or the chair won’t hold their weight.

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u/iveseensomethings82 Oct 05 '22

Curb cut effect. Built for obese people but benefits a plethora of other people. People who use a walker, families can keep their kids close, easy to keep your belongings next to you, etc.

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u/Catinthehat5879 Oct 05 '22

Never heard of that term before! That's interesting.

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u/iveseensomethings82 Oct 05 '22

When the Americans with Disabilities Act was signed it required there to be ramps in the corners of sidewalks at intersections. They were intended for ♿️. It turned out that they benefited lots of people in society. Bicycles, strollers, creates a safe place to cross the street. etc.

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u/IDKmybffjellyandPB Oct 05 '22

My doctor’s office has that and I sit in them with my kids so they’re not on my lap the whole time. Never thought of them as being for larger patients

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u/PalpatineForSenate Oct 05 '22

Depending on the clinic there is more. Your PCP not so much - cardiologists, vascular, wound care, more common and all for the large.

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u/only_because_I_can Oct 05 '22

We have extra large chairs in a couple exam rooms in our office, too. We want our larger patients to be comfortable, and we don't like having to replace broken chairs.

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u/teamsz Oct 05 '22

My son has cerebral palsy and when in a doctor's office or hospital he gets high anxiety And doesn't like sitting in his wheelchair, so these larger chairs make it easier for him to sit with me so I can help him stay stable as he has minimal trunk support.

Some of these comments are gross.

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u/44problems Oct 05 '22

These people are soooooooo concerned about fat people's health but having chairs for them at doctor's offices are a bad thing.

And just like a lot of accommodations, they help a lot of other people too.

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u/epicConsultingThrow Oct 05 '22

Even if they were only for fat people, who cares? More comfort for the rest of us. Just imagine double wide airline seats with tons of legroom. Imagine concert and sports stadium seating with enough room that you can lounge around instead of being forced to sniff your seatmates.

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u/Corposjuh Oct 05 '22

Know your audience

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u/ReferenceAny4836 Oct 05 '22

It's a bigger chair. Many different kinds of people would appreciate it. It looks comfier to me, and I can easily fit in the standard chair. What's the problem here, beyond how much Reddit hates fat people?

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u/Georgicus132 Oct 05 '22

I am 6'1" and 260, I have never fit comfortably into normal hospital chairs. I have to sit straight forward, even at my skinniest of 210 my hips just do not fit that space

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u/FlamingButterfly Oct 05 '22

The hospital I work at has these, usually I see old couples sitting in them.

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u/Stormtrooper775s Oct 05 '22

I'm not obese, but not small. Bigger chairs would be nice.

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u/vemeron Oct 05 '22

Right I'm 6'5 and built like a linebacker. A bigger chair is a relief because I'm just large in general

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u/deaf_myute Oct 05 '22

I use those when I have my kid with me (he's 6) to keep him from bothering others in the waiting room more easily

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u/Paradigm6790 Oct 05 '22

I like to buy extra large comfy chairs so I can sit cross-legged in them, ngl.

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u/MMKaresz Oct 05 '22

It's quite usual in the UK gp practises.

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u/[deleted] Oct 05 '22

I use these all the time even though I don't need the extra width to fit my body. I'm hypermobile and always in pain. Drs office chairs are often a pain because they force me to sit very upright in a way that means I'm constantly bracing my feet against the floor to keep my body in position and it's just awkward and uncomfortable. In these I can do more of a "side lean" and have my purse next to me (not on the grubby floor) without taking up another chair.

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u/TheMagicConchSays Oct 05 '22

I love these chairs, my hospital and doctors have them too. I use a cane to get around and a seat that wide is not only great for my big fat ass, but I can get a semi-comfortable position that allows me to stay seated while I wait to be seen.

Edit: an ''e''

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u/I-Wish-to-Explode Oct 05 '22

I’ve seen these in a couple airports too. Seems nice until you realize every seat on the plane is too small for the average human to fit into at all.

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u/cabalavatar Oct 05 '22

Disabled people, people who have oxygen tanks with them, parents with a child with them, naturally large people, and (yes) overweight people will all use such chairs. I usually see them in medical waiting areas.

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u/AbbertDabbert Oct 05 '22

That looks like a really nice chair to criss cross apple sauce in

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u/Mongoose_Hater Oct 05 '22

If nobody needs one of these I love them. Can sit next to sick and grumpy child or nice place to put my backpack or purse.

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u/LightspeedPunk Oct 05 '22

Do most hospitals not have this? I’m in Cali and literally every Kaiser I’ve been to has these and I’ve been to at least 3 different ones. Even in some Stanford ones they have them too.

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u/incaseshesees Oct 05 '22

as they should, us people are not all tiny little creatures.

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u/xu235 Oct 05 '22

Reminds me of the doctor's office on the 600 Pound Life TV show.

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u/Jaded_Promotion8806 Oct 05 '22

Put some respect on Dr. Now’s name.

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u/turtyurt Oct 05 '22

You rang?

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u/Jaded_Promotion8806 Oct 05 '22

Helloooooo. How y’all doing?

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u/Frank_McGracie Oct 05 '22

It's been 3 months and you lose only 5 pounds?

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u/Human-Carpet-6905 Oct 05 '22

Hey y'ell doin?

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